Harper's First [ -sixth] Reader, Book 6

Front Cover
Orville T. Bright, James Baldwin
American Book Company, 1890 - Readers

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Contents

Jerusalem by Moonlight Benjamin Disraeli
48
Pleasantness Arthur Helps
54
The High Tide on the coast of Lincolnshire Jean Ingelou
57
The Vision of Mirzah Joseph Addison
63
On Right Living Sir Thomas Browne
67
My Library and My Garden Alexander Smith
70
The Vale of Cashmere Thomas Moore
74
Hâtim the Giver Edwin Arnold
84
The Assassination of Cæsar James Anthony Froude
86
Antonys Oration over Cæsars Boily Wm Shakespeare
93
Aphorisms Jonathan Swift
97
Oliver Goldsmith Thomas Babington Macaulay
101
From The Vicar of Wakefield Oliver Goldsmith
117
King Canute William Makepeace Thackeray
121
Wealth versus Enjoyment Jeremy Taylor
126
The Poor Relation Charles Lamb
129
William the Conqueror at Ely Charles Kingsley
135
Magna Charta Henry Hallam
142
Iphigeneia and Agamemnon Walter Savage Landor
146
A Roman Supperparty Walter Pater
148
The Trial by Combat Sir Walter Scott
155
Lament for the Decline of Chivalry Thomas Hood
166
Simon de Montfort David Hume
168
Custom and Tradition Philip Gilbert Hamerton
171
Mrs Poyser and the Squire George Eliot
177
The Isles of Greece Lord Byron
185
Reading for Profit John Morley
188
Zenobia Edward Gibbon
193
The Delectable Mountains i John Bunyan
198
To a Skylark Percy Bysshe Shelley
202
Culture in the Fourteenth Century David Masson
206
The Art of Improving Beauty Sir Richard Steele
211
Rab and his Friends Dr John Brown
216
The Battle of Beal an Duine Sir Walter Scott
233
My Introduction to Dr Johnson James Boswell
237
The Value of Time Samuel Johnson
240
The Flight of Time Thomas De Quincey
243
Christmas Day 1587 Walter Besant
297
The Spanish Armada Robert Southey
302
Ye Mariners of England Thomas Campbell
306
To Herodotus Andrew Lang
308
Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard Thomas Gray
314
Bells in the Desert Alexander W Kinglake
319
Handworkers and Headworkers John Ruskin
321
Ode On Intimations of Immortality Wm Wordsworth
327
Hervé Riel Robert Browning
334
The Impeachment of Warren Hastings Edmund Burke
340
America and the Mothercountry William Ewart Gladstone
343
LXy The Winter Evening William Corper
347
The Foundation of the British Empire Henry Edward Manning
350
Alexanders Feast John Dryden
353
Ode on St Cecilias Day Alexander Pope
358
An Interview with Napoleon R D Blackmore
362
England and America Frederick William Farrar
372
The Cotters Saturday Night Robert Burns
375
The Liberty of the Press John Milton
381
Revolutions Edward BulwerLytton
385
The Souls Errand Sir Walter Raleigh
390
Lessons of the Nineteenth Century Fredk Harrison
393
Lycidas John Milton
401
Work Thomas Carlyle
407
On True Valor Ben Jonson
414
On Discourse Sir Francis Bacon
416
Una and the Lion Edmund Spenser
418
Democracy John Stuart Blackie
421
Crossing the Bar Alfred Tennyson
425
Scene from The Merchant of Venice William Shakespeare
426
The Majority and the Remnant Matthew Arnold
437
NOTES for the Use of Teachers and Pupils
449
Edwin Arnold 84 458 David Hume 168 468
451
Walter Besant 297 481 Samuel Johnson 240
463
George Eliot 177 468 Percy Bysshe Shelley 202
472
F W Farrar 372 492 Samuel Smiles 17 450
482
INDEX to Notes
501

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Page 94 - Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And, sure, he is an honourable man. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause: What cause withholds you then to mourn for him? O Judgment: thou art fled to brutish beasts, And men have lost their reason.
Page 202 - All the earth and air With thy voice is loud, As, when night is bare, From one lonely cloud The moon rains out her beams, and heaven is overflowed.
Page 203 - What thou art we know not; What is most like thee? From rainbow clouds there flow not Drops so bright to see As from thy presence showers a rain of melody. Like a poet hidden In the light of thought, Singing hymns unbidden Till the world is wrought To sympathy with hopes and fears it heeded not...
Page 315 - Muse, The place of fame and elegy supply: And many a holy text around she strews That teach the rustic moralist to die. For who, to dumb forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er resign'd, [141] Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing lingering look behind?
Page 312 - The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea, The ploughman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and to me. Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight, And all the air a solemn stillness holds, Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight, And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds...
Page 313 - Perhaps in this neglected spot is laid Some heart once pregnant with celestial fire; Hands, that the rod of empire might have sway'd, Or wak'd to ecstasy the living lyre.
Page 329 - The thought of our past years in me doth breed Perpetual benediction: not indeed For that which is most worthy to be blest — Delight and liberty, the simple creed Of Childhood, whether busy or at rest, With new-fledged hope still fluttering in his breast...
Page 404 - Through the dear might of him that walked the waves Where other groves and other streams along, With nectar pure his oozy locks he laves, And hears the unexpressive nuptial song, In the blest kingdoms meek of joy and love. There entertain him all the saints above, In solemn troops and sweet societies That sing, and singing in their glory move And wipe the tears for ever from his eyes.
Page 204 - What objects are the fountains Of thy happy strain? What fields, or waves, or mountains? What shapes of sky or plain? What love of thine own kind ? what ignorance of pain ? With thy clear keen joyance Languor cannot be: Shadow of annoyance Never came near thee: Thou lovcst; but ne'er knew love's sad satiety.
Page 376 - The sire turns o'er, wi' patriarchal grace, The big ha' Bible, ance his father's pride: His bonnet rev'rently is laid aside, His lyart haffets wearing thin an' bare; .Those strains that once did sweet in Zion glide, He wales a portion with judicious care ; And ' Let us worship God !* he says, with solemn air.

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