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MONTHLY MIRROR,

FOR

SEPTEMBER, 1805.

Embellished with A PORTRAIT OF MRS. H. JOHNSTON, OF COVENT-GARDEN THEATRE,

ENGRAVED BY RIDLEY, FROM A FINE PAINTING BY J. R. SMITH.

CONTENTS.
MISCELLANEOUS.

A Vindication of the Modern His-
Correspondence,

146
tory of Hindostan

183 Copy of a Letter from the Empe- Ballads, by William Hayley, Esq. 184

ror of China to the Sultan Storer and Greig's Views in North
Shahrokh

147
Britain

185 Anecdotes of Churchill

149
Modern Paris

186 Skaiting

152

A Poetical Epistle to the Right Cowperiana, No. XII........... 153 Hon. William Pitt

188 Cursory Remarks on Dr. Johnson's Carr's Northern Summer .......... ib. Dictionary

155 Burke's first Thoughts of London 159

BRITISII STAGE. Anecdotes

162 Intoxication

Shakspeare and Ben Jonson ...... 191

Some Account of Mossop the The Reformer of Messina 165

Tragedian

192

164

........... 174

REVIEW OF LITERATURE.

ORIGINAL POETRY.
GENERAL.
A first View of the Sea

197 Gifford's Plays of Philip Massin- Address, occasioned by the Death ger

169 of the Duke of Gloucester 199 Adams's Roman History

Appeal to the Public

200 The Chaplet

175 Memoirs of Charles Lee Lewes .. 176 MEMORANDA DRAMATICA, Shore's Practical Treatise on

Drury-Lane

201 Brewing ...............

178

Covent-Garden ....................... 202 Butler's Exercises on the Globes ib. Nativity of Napoleon Buonaparte, 179

Haymarket

203 The Poems of Ossian, &c. ....

Royal Circus

ib. M-Kinnen's Tour through the

Astley's Amphitheatre British West Indies

Sadler's Wells

ib. ib.

Laurent's Theatre, Lyceum ib,
Elements of Natural Philosophy 180
Wilson's Philosophy of Physic... ib.

PROVINCIAL DRAMA,
Turnbull's Voyage round the
World
ib Glasgow

206 Cockin's Rural Sabbath, a Poem 182

Norwich .........

................... 207 Eliz. Hamilton's Life of Agrippina ib.

Richmond

208 Valle-Crucis Abbey

ib.
Edinburgh

ib, A Tour to Worthing

183

Falkirk Theatricals ................... 210 Mavor's Historical Account of the Voyages of Captain Cook ..... ib. " News, &c.

212

........ 205

ib,

London:
PRINTED, FOR THE PROPRIETORS,
By J. Wright, No. 38, St. John's Square, Clerkenwell,
And published by Vernor and Hood, in the Poultry;
Sold, also, by all Booksellers in

the United Kingdom.

1

CORRESPONDENCE.

The Biographical Sketch of Mrs. H. JOHNSTON in our next.

MERCUTIO is informed that he may safely pursue the method he has hitherto adopted.

It is not our practice to revoke the criticism we have felt it our duty to pass on books noticed in the review. E. F. will observe that the editors of this work are not connected with the other publication he mentions.

The remarks on the History of Egypt, which did not reach us early enough for this number, shall certainly appear next month,

SABLE's lines on the general mourning, are, as Scrub says, “ very dolorous indeed.”

The IDLER is an illegitimate offspring. There is not one of Dr. Johnson's gigantic features in the ricketty babe presented to us; and we shall therefore decline the honour of being its foster-father.

We do not question the veracity of our Canterbury correspondent, but we deny the position he has advanced respecting the monastery of St. Augustin. It is a mere Canterbury Tale,

The Goose for a loi Comedian, by a FLINT, must be administered through another channel. The Ode which accompanies it has been cabbaged from a deceased poet. Though some pains have been taken to botch it up, it is after all only “ a thing of shreds and patches,.

CASTALI0, in some future number, may find that his hints have not been lost upon us.

P. L. R. is welcome to take the measures he has proposed.

If the Lines to the Forest Oak possessed any of the vigour and luxuriance which distinguish the subject he has chosen, we would readily have obliged Mu. Sæus by their insertion.

MONTHLY MIRROR,

FOR

SEPTEMBER, 1805.

COPY OF A LETTER FROM THE EMPEROR OF CHINA

TO

THE SULTAN SHAHROKH, THE SON OF TIMUR.

From the Annals of the Hidjerah, Year 822 (commencing 27 Jan

nuary, 1419.). In the annals of the year 820 it was mentioned that Day-Ming Khan, Emperor of China, sent ambassadors that year to the court of his inajesty at his capital of Herat, who dispatched Ardasher Tavadry with them when they went back to China. Ardasher at this time returned from thence, and gave his majesty an account of that country, and of the approach of a new embassy. About the end of Ramzan (October 14 19) the ambassadors Bimąchin aud Janmachin arrived at Herat, and presented to the king the presents and rarities they had brought, and a letter from the Emperor of China, a copy of which is here subjoined, written in their manner, which is this ; they write the name of their monarch on the first line, and begin the others at some distance below, and when, in the course of the letter, they come to the name of God, they leave off and begin a new line with that, and they follow the same method in writing the name of a sovereign prince. The letter therefore, which was sent on the present occasion, is here inserted, having been copied word for word from the originad, in the manner above described.

“-The great Emperor Day-Ming sends this letter to Sultan Shahroth. We conceive that

-The Most High has made you knowing and wise, and perfect, that the kingdom of the Islamites may be well governed, and it is owing to this that the men of that kingdom are become prosperous.

“ Your Majesty is of an enlightened mind, skilful, accomplished, and judicious, and superior to all the Islamites. You honour and obey the commands of

-The Most High, and you reverence the things that relate to him, which is the way to enjoy his protection.

“We, on a foriner occasion, sent Amir Seyra-Lido with others as our ambassadors, who arrived at

-Your Majesty's

sent to us.

court, and you were pleased to receive them with much honour and ceremony, which Lido and the rest represented to us, so that it has all been made clear and manifest, and fully known to us.

Your ambassadors Beg Buko and the others also arrived here with Lido and the rest, on their return, and delivered at this court all the presents of tigers, Arabian horses, lynxes, and other things which you

We viewed them all. You have on this occasion displayed the sincerity of your affection, and we are exceedingly sensible of your kindness. The western country, which is the seat of Islamisin, has from old time been famous for producing wise and good men, but it is probable that none have been superior to-Your Majesty. Well may we afford protection and encouragement to the men of that country, for we deem it consonant to the will of Heaven that we should do so. Indeed, how should not The Most High be well pleased with those men who practise mutual affection, where one heart reflects the sentiments of another, as mirror opposed to mirror, and that though at a distance! In the eye of friendship, generosity and civility are precious above all things, but even in these also there is somewhat more particularly so. We now send Uchangku and others, in company

with
your

ambassadors Beg-Buka and the rest, who will deliver to

-Your Majesty our presents, consisting of seven Sungkurs, each of which we have flown with our own hands, and Kimkhas &c. Though Sungkurs are not produced in this our empire of China, they are constantly brought us as rarities from the sea-coasts, so that we have always enow; but in that country of yours, it seems they are scarce. We have sent you choice ones, such as might be deemed worthy the great soul of

-Your Majesty. In themselves, to be sure, they are of little value, but as they are tokens of our affection, we trust they will be acceptable to

-Your Majesty. Henceforth it is requisite that the sincerity of our friendship be increased, and that ambassadors and merchants be always passing and re-passing between us without interruption, to the end that our subjects may all live in plenty, ease, and security. We may then assuredly hope that

-The Most High will make us experience more of his goodness and mercy.

“This is what we have thought proper to write to you."

Each time that letters from the Emperor of China were thus brought to his majesty, there were three; and each was written in three different sorts of characters; that is to say, first, in the vulgar character in which we now write, and in the Persian language; secondly, in the Alogul character, which is that of the Yegurs, and in the Turkish language; and thirdly in the Chinese character and language : but the purport was exactly the same in all. There was another, which contained a particular account of the things sent, whether living creatures or other rarities, and was written in like manner in these three languages and characters. And there was likewise a letter to answer the purpose of a pass, which was written like the rest in these three languages and characters. The dates of months and years inserted in each, were those of the emperor's reign.

ANECDOTES OF CHURCHILL. Extracted from Cook's entertaining Memoirs of Foote, recently

published.

Sport to

you, but

Or this poet,—who has flourished, and almost faded, in our day,– the following particulars are but very little known, and, I believe, never before published.

Soon after the publication of his Rosciad (a poem which, however meritorious in some particulars, contains many

illiberal and partial criticisms), he was sitting one night at the Rose tavern, in company with the late Mat. Clarke, of Covent-Garden theatre: when Churchill, who was intoxicated with the applause given him by his flatterers, was repeating with great energy some parts of this poem. “ Ah !” said Clarke, “ this may be

you

should consider it is death to a great many of my brother-performers.”—“Pooh! pooh!" cried the other; “they are fair game for a satirist!"_“You may think so,” said Clarke;“ but if you mentioned me in the manner you have some of them, I would have shown you the difference.

Why, what would you do?”—“Only knock you down,” said Clarke, the

very first place I saw you in." Here Churchill retired a few paces, and put himself into a pugilistic attitude; which Clarke perceiving, he snatched up a case-knife in one hand, and a corner of the cloth which was laid for supper in the other, and then exclaimed, “Come, come; none of your bullying tricks with me: if you have a mind to see what I can do, take that knife and the other end of the cloth, and let us fairly see who is the best man, the player or the libeller.” Terrified at this fierce and very unexpected onset, Churchill paused for some time; then taking him by the hand, said, “he was a manly fellow, and the last person in the world to whom he would willingly give offence.”

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