William Wallace: Guardian of Scotland

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Courier Corporation, 1898 - Biography & Autobiography - 159 pages
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The assassination of Scotland's King Alexander III in 1286 foreshadowed troubles with the English. When Edward I of England failed in his attempt to place his niece upon the Scottish throne, a gap appeared in the royal succession, giving the Scots an opportunity to place one of their own at the head of government. The leader of the movement was William Wallace (c. 1270-1305), a fateful figure in the history of Scotland. This brief study recounts Wallace's legendary life — from his years as a youth and young man spearheading guerrilla warfare against the English, to his designation as "Guardian of Scotland," and his ultimate betrayal and execution. A vivid record of a leader with a powerful hold on the imagination of his people, this important book will be welcomed by students of history and admirers of the Scottish patriot.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
11
WALLACES FAMILY AND EARLY YEARS
41
CHAPTER III
56
CHAPTER IV
72
CHAPTER V
89
WALLACE IN FRANCE m
111
THE LEADERSHIP OF THE BARONS
116
CHAPTER VIII
134
CHAPTER IX
151
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About the author (1898)

A. F. Murison, MA, LLD, KC. (1847 - 1934) was an eminent Professor of Roman Law and Jurisprudence at University College, London and at Oxford University. He was a prolific writer for newspapers and journals in a wide variety of subjects with comparatively few publications in his specialism of Roman Law. He collated the text of Theophilus' Greek paraphrasis of Justinian's Institutes but failed to finish his extensive work in this field. However, his translation of Theophilus was published in 2010 as the parallel English text accompanying the Greek in the new edition. He also wrote two biographical works in Scottish history: Sir William Wallace (1898) and King Robert the Bruce (1899) in the Famous Scots Series published by Oliphant, Anderson and Ferrier. Lack of money took him into journalism and he was editor of the Educational Times (now the Times Educational Supplement) from 1902 to 1912 and on the staff of the Daily Chronicle. He even had time to enter politics and he stood as a Liberal Party candidate in at least three General Elections: for the Glasgow and Aberdeen Universities constituency in 1906 and for the Glasgow Central constituency in December 1910 and January 1910 and lost on all three occasions to a Conservative candidate. He died on 8 June 1934 at his home in Clapham Common, London.

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