History of the Later Roman Empire from Arcadius to Irene

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Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2008 - History - 608 pages
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Apsimar and his party sailed directly to Constantinople, and anchored at Sycae. For a time Leontius held out, but his enemies succeeded in bribing certain officers who possessed keys of the gates to admit them near the palace of Blachernae. When the soldiers obtained admission they stripped the inhabitants of their goods and plundered their houses. It was an unfortunate year for the citizens of Constantinople. They had hardly recovered from a deadly plague which had ravaged the city for four months, when they were forced to submit to violence and pillage at the hands of the troops who were paid to defend them. We shall see this occurrence repeated before many years have elapsed. -from Chapter XIII: "Twenty Years of Anarchy" This classic two-volume history of the Later Roman Empire, first published in 1889, remains one of the most readable works on the era, and is highly recommended for students of Roman culture. Volume II explores: [ the age of Justinian [ the slaves [ changes in the provincial administration [ the geography of Europe at the end of Justinian's reign [ Byzantine art [ notes on the manners, industries, and commerce in the age of Justinian [ the Lombards in Italy [ the empire and the Franks [ literature of the sixth century [ monotheletism [ dismemberment of the empire by the Saracens [ foundation of the Bulgarian kingdom [ twenty years of anarchy [ social and religious decay in the seventh century [ the geographical aspect of Europe at the end of the eighth century [ and much, much more. British historian JOHN BAGNELL BURY (1861-1927) was professor of modern history at Cambridge. His writings, known for a readability combined with a scholarly depth, include History of Greece (1900) and Idea of Progress (1920).
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER XIII
25
Changes in the map of Europe between 395 A D and 565 a d The legend
31
CHAPTER XV
40
CHAPTER XVI
55
THE COLLAPSE OF JUSTINIANS SYSTEM
65
584
83
Causes of warThe TurksInvasion of SyriaDeath of two thousand virgins
95
FOUNDATION OF THE BULGARIAN KINGDOM
331
ORIGIN OP THE SYSTEM OP THEMES
339
General surveyReign of LeontiusLoss of AfricaTiberius IIIArmenia
352
Conspiracy of ArtemiusArtavasdosBirth coronation and marriage of Con
408
Note on the chronology of the eighth century 425427
425
The true significance of the iconocJasm of Leo and ConstantineRationalism
437
CHAPTER V
450
Genealogical table of the Isaurian dynasty
459

CHAPTER IV
114
Note on Slavonic settlements in Greece 143144
143
1 the vulgar dialect 2 the lan
167
CHAPTER VIII
175
CHAPTER I
197
CHAPTER II
207
1011
227
CHAPTER IV
249
1213
254
CHAPTER VI
258
Reign of Constantine III and HeraclonasDeath of ConstantineMartina
281
1112
308
Note on Greek fire
319
1314
320
Hostility of Constantine to monasticismHis merry courtAttitude to art
460
755
470
CHAPTER IX
480
CHAPTER X
494
CHAPTER I
499
The Empires and the caliphatesComparison of the Roman Empire and
510
SOCIETY IN THE EIGHTH CENTURY
518
CHAPTER XIV
535
Index 541579
541
Constantinople besieged by the SaracensEgyptian Christians desertPlague
554
Extension of the SlovenesOrigin of the CroatiansInvasion of Dalmatia
556
Relations of the Empire with the sons of Chlotar I EmbassiesGundo vald
574
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