Monthly Bulletin of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Volume 24

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Page 252 - ... tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, [read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life,] reexamine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul...
Page 310 - May I be pardoned if, upon this occasion, I mention that away back in my childhood, the earliest days of my being able to read, I got hold of a small book, such a one as few of the younger members have ever seen, Weems
Page 251 - The greatest poet hardly knows pettiness or triviality. If he breathes into any thing that was before thought small it dilates with the grandeur and life of the universe. He is a seer. ... he is individual ... he is complete in himself. . . . the others are as good as he, only he sees it and they do not.
Page 82 - The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities...
Page 315 - ... meeting-house, at Lexington, where now the obelisk of granite, with a slab of slate inlaid, commemorates the first fallen of the Revolution. And when our fathers were toiling at the breastwork on Bunker's Hill, all through that night the old warrior walked his rounds. Long, long may it be, ere he comes again ! His hour is one of darkness, and adversity, and peril. But should domestic tyranny oppress us, or the invader's step pollute our soil, still may the Gray Champion come, for he I is the...
Page 311 - Then out spake brave Horatius, The Captain of the gate : 'To every man upon this earth Death cometh soon or late; And how can man die better Than facing fearful odds, For the ashes of his fathers And the temples of his Gods...
Page 572 - Come, bring with a noise, My merrie, merrie boyes, The Christmas log to the firing ; While my good dame, she Bids ye all be free, And drink to your hearts desiring.
Page 317 - If ye break faith with us who die, We shall not sleep, though poppies blow In Flanders fields.
Page 424 - Which done, another made a speech to the Indians, in the name of all the...
Page 252 - ... knows that the young man who composedly periled his life and lost it has done exceeding well for himself, while the man who has not periled his life and retains it to old age in riches and ease has perhaps achieved nothing for himself worth mentioning...

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