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Sfi

agri

by dropping or altering the Latin termination, or by the substitution of one vowel for another, as i for a, e for a, &c.

LATIN STEMs.
Latin worıls.

Stems. English words.
acer (acris), sharp

acri

acrimony acdes, a house

edi

edifice facio, I make

ratification

edify acquus, equal

sequa equanimity

equi equilibrium animus, mind

anim animosity

s libration 1:bra, a pound or balance libr

I equilibrium aer, air

aeri

aerial, aeriform aevum, an age

ev

coeval ager (agri), a fielil

agriculture cultura, cullivation

cultur culture azger, a heap

agger

exaggerate ago, I do, act

Şay

agent, agency act

actor, active ala, a wing

ali

aliped pes (pedis), a foot

ped

pedestrian altus, high

alt

altitude, exalt

s amic amicable
amicus, a friend

1 imic inimical
ami

amiable
amo, I love

aтor

amorous amat

amatory anima, life, the soul anim

animate verto, I turn

vert

animadvert ad, to

adequate an12

annals annus, a year

аппе

annual

enni biennial bis, tuice

biped

s aqua aquatic aqua, water

aque aqueduct ductus, a leading

duct,

conduct arceo, I keep off

crce

coerce aro, I plough

ar

arabie

artificer, artist

Sart ars (artis), art

inert artus, a joint

arti articulation : asper, rough

asper asperity, exasperate audio, I hear

Saudi

audience

audit auditor augeo, I increase

aug

augment auctio, an increasing auct

auction auctor, an originator auth

author avis, a bird

avi

aviary bealus, blessed

beati beatitude bellum, war

belli belligerent
bel

rebel
Sger

belligerent gero, I carry on

l gest gesture

ad

bi

ert

Garrison Orders.

“ Head-Quarters, 6th May, 1779. " At a general court-martial, held in Edinburgh Castle, on Thursday the 6th May, and two followiog days, whereof Lieut.-Colonel Dundas, of the 11th Dragoons, was president, for the trial of Charles Williamson and Archibald Mac-Ivor, soldiers of the 42nd regiment, and Robert Budge, soldier of the 71st regiment, accused of mutiny, at Leith, on the 20th April, and instigating others to do the same, the court unanimously found the prisoners guilty of mutiny, being a breach of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th articles of war; and hav. ing duly considered the evil tendency of mutiny and sedition, especially when carried to such enormous lengths as in the present case, do adjudge you the aforesaid Charles Williamson, Archibald Mac-Ivor, and Robert Budge, to be shot to death!

The poor prisoners remained on their knees while a Highland officer translated the foregoing into Gaelic. They were all pale and composed but the last, who was suffering from severe wounds received at Leith; his countenance was emaciated and ghastly, and he was sinking from excessive debility. Their eyes were bound up; The officer retired; the provost-marshal approached, and ordered his party to load. They were in the act of taking aim at the prisoners, who were praying intently in Gaelic, when Sir Adolphus Oughton stepped forward, and, displaying three pardons, commanded them to recover arms." "Soldiers !” said he, “in consequence of the distinguished valour of the Royal Highlanders, to which two of these unfortunate men belong. his Majesty has been graciously pleased to forgive them all. Prisoners ! rise, resume your arms, and rejoin your companies.” An officer repeated these words in Gaelic. The scene and the whole proceedings were so solemn and affecting that the prisoners were incapable of speech. Raising their bonnets they endeavoured to express their gratitude by a faint cheer, but their voices utterly failed them; and, overcome by weakness and a revulsion of feeling, the soldier of the 71st sank prostrate on the ground between the coffins.-“ Memorials of the Castle of Edinburgh,' p. 257-259.

LATIN STEMS. We are about to lay before the student a large portion of the roots of the Latin language. In the study of them, he may become acquainted with the treasures of the Roman literature, and the tone and strength of the Roman mind. These lessons do not, indeed, lie on the surface. Nevertheless, they are to be learnt by care and diligence. For this purpose, impress on your mind the preceding remarks, and remembering that a language is the mirror of a nation's mind, accustom yourself to see and contemplate the Romans in their words—those unerring tokens of thought, those mental miniatures.

Of course it is only so much of the Latin vocabulary as exists in English that I shall set forth in these pages. The Latin words found in English exist almost exclusively in combination. The combinations in which they appear vary in kind. The combination may consist of one word and a suffix, or one word and a prefix; or, again, of two words with or without terminating forms. The combinations require certain changes. The changes are effected

by dropping or altering the Latin termination, or by the substitution of one vowel for another, as i for a, e for a, &c.

LATIN STEMS.
Latin words.

Stems. English words. acer (acris), sharp

acri

acrimony acdes, a house

edi

edifice facio, I make

S.fi

ratification

edify aequus, equal

sequa equanimity

equi equilibrium animus, mind

anim animosity libra, a pound or balance

S libration libr

l equilibrium aer, air

aer

aerial, aeriform aerum, an age

ev

coeval ager (agri), a fiell

agri

agriculture cultura, cultivation

cultur culture azger, a heap

agger exaggerate ago, I do, act

şay

agent, agency I act

actor, active ala, a wing

ali

aliped pes (pedis), a foot ped

pedestrian altus, high

alt

altitude, exalt

Jamic amicable amicus, a friend

I imic

inimical ami

amiable amo, I love

amor

amorous

amat amatory anima, life, the soul anim

animate verto, I turn

vert

animadvert ad, to

adequate ann

annals annus, a year

аппе

annual

enni biennial bis, tuice

biped

αφια aqua, water

aquatic laque

aqueduct ductus, a leading

duct

conduct arceo, I keep off

erce

coerce aro, I plough

ar

arabie

art ars (artis), art

artificer, artist Vert

inert artus, a joint

arti articulation : asper, rough

asper asperity, exasperate audio, I hear

Saudi audience

2 audit auditor augeo, I increase

aug

augment auctio, an increasing

auct

auction auctor, an originator auth

author avis, a bird

aviary beatus, blessed

beati beatitude bellum, war

Sbelli belligerent
{bet

rebel
Sger

belligerent gero, 1 carry on

l gest gesture

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canto,

I sing

LATIN STEMS. Latin words.

Stems. English words. re, back, in opposition re

repel, repulse bellus, beautiful

bell

embellish, belle bene, well

bene benediction dictio, a saying

dictio malediction bibo, I drink

bib

wine-bibber, imbibe bini, two, each

bin

combination, binary brevís, short

brev

brevity, abbreviate cado, I fall

Scad

cadaverous

accident casus, a fall

cas

casual caedo, I cut

cid

homicide caesus, cut

cis

incision, precision calor, heat

calor

caloric candeo, I burn

scens

incense cend

incendiary candesco, I begin to burn 'candesc incandescence canis, a dog

can

canine cant

canticles cent

precentor capillus, hair

capill capillary caput, (capītis), the head {

capit

capital

Icipit precipitate capio, I take

j cap, capt, cip capable, capture

I cipi, cept anticipate, recipient, carcer, a prison

carcer incarcerate (receptive

carniverous caro, (carni.), flesh

I carni
carn

incarnate voro, I devour

vor

voracious carus, dear

car

caress sced

recede, success cedo, I give place to

Icess

concession, access celer, swift

ccler

celerity, accelerare centum, a hundred

cent

century, centennial cerno, I separate, see cern

discern cretus, separated

cret

secretion, discre(e)t cete, a whale

cet

cetaceous cinctus, girded

cinct

succinct, precincts citus, quickly moved cit

cite, excitement I clam

exclamation clamo, I call out

( claim

proclaim

( clarify clarus, clear

i declara claudo, I shut

chuid

include, exclude clausus, shut

s claus clause
clus

seclusion clino, I bend, lie

clin

clinical, recline clivus, a slope

cliv

declivity, acclivity coelum, heaven

celestial colo, 1 cultivate, inhabit

colony comes, (comitis), a com comit concomitant copia, plenty [panion copi

copious coquo, I cook

colo)k, to cocker coctiis, cooked

ccct

decoction

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