Dracula

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1999 - Children's plays, English - 128 pages
2 Reviews
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A powerful adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel, with accomanying activities on the novel itself, the background to the Dracula myth, and the fascination it continues to exert. The play offers roles for 23 actors (14 male, 9 female).

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User Review  - lkmuir - LibraryThing

After discovering the double identity of the wealthy Transylvanian nobleman, Count Dracula, a small group of people vow to rid the world of the evil vampire. Illustrated notes throughout the text explain the historical background of the story. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - hermit_9 - LibraryThing

Stoker’s work is a classic. This binding, the illustrations, and supporting materials make this edition the most pleasurable I have encountered. Read full review

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About the author (1999)

Bram Stoker was born in Dublin, the son of a civil servant. Although a semi-invalid as a child, he went on the gain a reputation as a fine athlete at Trinity College, where he also excelled in mathematics and philosophy. Stoker worked as a civil servant and a journalist before becoming the personal secretary of the famous actor Henry Irving. He also wrote 15 works of fiction, only one of which is very memorable - Dracula (1897). This work, involving hypnotism, magic, the supernatural, and other elements of gothic fiction, went on to sell over one million copies and is still selling strongly today. So well known has his fictional character become that today it is possible to visit the castle of Count Dracula in the Transylvanian region of Romania, a country that Stoker never visited. Several film versions of the story, both serious and comic, have made Stoker's work a part of modern mythology. His novel The Lair of the White Worm (1911) has also been made into film. It and the novel The Lady of the Shroud are, like Dracula, fantastic tales of horror.

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