Woman's a riddle; or, Baby Warmstrey, Volume 1

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Page 88 - Almighty's form Glasses itself in tempests: in all time, Calm or convulsed — in breeze, or gale, or storm. Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark-heaving; — boundless, endless, and sublime; The image of eternity, the throne Of the Invisible: even from out thy slime The monsters of the deep are made; each zone Obeys thee; thou goest forth, dread, fathomless, alone.
Page 43 - As for nobility in particular persons, it is a reverend thing to see an ancient castle or building not in decay, or to see a fair timber tree sound and perfect; how much more to behold an ancient noble family, which hath stood against the waves and weathers of time?
Page 88 - Almighty's form Glasses itself in tempests; in all time, Calm or convulsed — in breeze or gale or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime, Dark-heaving, boundless, endless and sublime — The image of eternity — the throne Of the Invisible; even from out thy slime The monsters of the deep are made; each zone Obeys thee; thou goest forth, dread, fathomless, alone.
Page 136 - Truth, they say, lies in a well, Why, I vow I ne'er could see; Let the water-drinkers tell, There it always lay for me. For when sparkling wine went round, Never saw I falsehood's mask; But still honest truth I found In the bottom of each flask. True, at length my vigour's flown, I have years to bring decay; Few the locks that now I own, And the few I have are grey.
Page 114 - She moved : yet sure she was a gentle maid ! And in each motion her most innocent soul Beamed forth so brightly, that who saw would say, Guilt was a thing impossible in her...
Page 25 - tis hard with us to define. In other Countries he is known by his Privileges; in Westminster -Hall he is one that is reputed one ; in the Court of Honour, he that hath Arms. The King cannot make a Gentleman of Blood. [What have you said ?] Nor God Almighty: but he can make a Gentleman by Creation. If you ask which is the better of these two, Civilly, the Gentleman of Blood, Morally, the Gentleman by Creation may be the better; for the other may be a Debauched Man, this a Person of worth.
Page 236 - Have you any idea what sort of thing a truly elegant English woman of fashion is? I suspect not; for it is not to be seen almost out of England, and I do not know very well how to describe it. Great quietness, simplicity, and delicacy of manners, with a certain dignity and self-possession that puts vulgarity out of countenance, and keeps presumption in awe ; a singularly sweet, soft, and rather low, voice, with remarkable elegance and ease of diction; a perfect taste in wit and manners and conversation,...
Page 274 - It is their funeral knell ! and gliding near Methinks the phantoms of the dead appear ; But lo ! emerging from the watery grave Again they float incumbent on the wave, Again the dismal prospect opens round, — The wreck, the shore, the dying, and the drown'd...
Page 88 - Amasia hates a prude, and scorns restraint ; Whate'er she is, she'll not appear a saint :. Her soul superior flies formality ; So gay her air, her conduct is so free, Some might suspect the nymph not over-good — Nor would they be mistaken, if they should.
Page 25 - The king cannot make a gentleman of blood, (what have you said) nor God Almighty, but he can make a gentleman by creation. If you ask, which is the better of these two? civilly, the gentleman of blood ; morally, the gentleman by creation may be the better ; for the other may be a debauched man, this a person of worth.

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