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" To suppose that the eye, with all its inimitable contrivances for adjusting the focus to different distances, for admitting different amounts of light, and for the correction of spherical and chromatic aberration, could have been formed by natural selection,... "
On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, Or The Preservation ... - Page 139
by Charles Darwin - 1875 - 458 pages
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The Methodist Quarterly Review

Theology - 1861
...himself is staggered when asked to explain the development of the eye by natural selection. He says : To suppose that the eye, with all its inimitable contrivances...selection, seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest possible degree. — P. 16Y. Tet he screws Up his courage to face the difficulty. Here ia e whole T>roeess...
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The Calcutta Review, Volume 35

1860
...he takes the eye, of which he writes : "To suppose that the eye with all its illimitable contrivance for adjusting the focus to different distances, for...selection, seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest possible degree. Yet reason tells me that if numerous grailntions from a perfect and complex eye, to...
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The Eclectic Review, Volume 3; Volume 111

William Hendry Stowell - English literature - 1860
...probability of there being fostililtroua rocks far below the Silurian, in a metamorphic condition. eye, with all its inimitable contrivances for adjusting...and for the correction of spherical and chromatic observation, could have been formed by natural selection seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest...
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The Christian observer [afterw.] The Christian observer and advocate

1860
...flight." This is a tolerable specimen of bold assumption; but what follows far surpasses it : — " To suppose that the eye, with all its inimitable contrivances...admitting different amounts of light, and for the correcting of spherical and chromatic aberration, could have been formed by natural selection, seems,...
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The Canadian Journal of Industry, Science and Art, Volume 5

Learned institutions and societies - 1860
...to our quotation, the last that our decreasing space will allow us to give. "To suppose I lint ihe eye, with all its inimitable contrivances for adjusting...distances, for admitting different amounts of light, uiid for tin: correction of spherical nnd chromatic aberration could have been formed, by niiturnl...
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The Theological and Literary Journal, Volume 13

1861
...create perfect eyes as the Almighty himself has. Inasmuch as God has created eyes with all their " inimitable contrivances for adjusting the focus to...correction of spherical and chromatic aberration," he holds there is no difficulty in believing natural selection can do it also; and by that he means...
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The Methodist Review, Volume 15; Volume 23; Volume 45

Methodist Church - 1863
...magician's wand that relieves him of every difficulty and brings about every result. Mr. Darwin says : To suppose that the eye, with all its inimitable contrivances...and for the correction of spherical and chromatic iberration, could have been formed by natural selection, seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest...
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The divine plan of revelation: an argument from internal evidence in support ...

1864
...time, the result to be so amazing as to be at first sight incredible ;* while another school only * "To suppose that the eye, with all its inimitable...aberration, could have been formed by natural selection, jeems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest possible degree. Yet reason tells me, that of numerous...
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On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection: Or, The Preservation ...

Charles Darwin - Evolution - 1864 - 440 pages
...diving thrushes, and petrels with the habite of auks. Organs of extreme perfection and complication. — To suppose that the eye, with all its inimitable contrivances...for adjusting the focus to different distances, for admiting different amounts of light, and for the correction of spherical and chromatic aberration,...
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St. Paul at Athens

William Lindsay Alexander - Athens (Greece) - 1865 - 322 pages
...ablest of the advocates of the Development Theory will clearly show. " To suppose," says Mr. Darwin, " that the eye, with all its inimitable contrivances...seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest degree. Yet reason tells us that of numerous gradations from a perfect and complex eye to one very imperfect...
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