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Books Books 1 - 10 of 40 on ... we see beautiful adaptations everywhere and in every part of the organic world..
" ... we see beautiful adaptations everywhere and in every part of the organic world. "
On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, Or The Preservation ... - Page 44
by Charles Darwin - 1875 - 458 pages
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Edinburgh Review, Or, Critical Journal, Volume 111

English literature - 1860
...but not the evidence of a creature linking on the cuttle-fish to the lump-fish. Mr. Darwin asks, ' How is it that varieties, which I have ' called incipient species, become ultimately good and distinct 'species?' To which we rejoin with the question; — Do they become good and distinct...
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all the year round

CHARLES DICKENS - 1860
...in the humblest parasite which elings to the hairs of a quadruped or the feathers of a bird ; in the structure of the beetle which dives through the water...everywhere and in every part of the organic world. How, asks Mr. Darwin, to whose theoretical views we purpose to recur hereafter—how have all these...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 66

Eliakim Littell, Robert S. Littell - 1860
...but not the evidence of a creature linking on the cuttle-fish to the lump-fish. Mr. Darwin asks, " How is it that varieties, which I have called incipient species, become ultimately good and distinct species ? " To which we rejoin with the question : — Do they become good and distinct...
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On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection: Or The Preservation ...

Charles Darwin - Evolution (Biology) - 1870 - 440 pages
...plainly in the humblest parasite which clings to the hairs of a quadruped or feathers of a bird ; in the structure of the beetle which dives through the water...plumed seed which is wafted by the gentlest breeze ; in snort, we see beautiful adaptations everywhere and in every part of the organic •world. Again, it...
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The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection: Or, The Preservation of ...

Charles Darwin - Evolution - 1882 - 458 pages
...plainly in the humblest parasite which clings to the hairs of a quadruped or feathers of a bird ; in the structure of the beetle which dives through the water...converted into good and distinct species, which in mest cases obviously differ from each other far more tlian do the varieties of the same species? How...
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Journal, Volume 3

Liverpool Geological Association - Geology - 1883
...Hence, I believe a well-marked Variety may be considered an incipient Species." Again, he says : — " It may be asked, how is it that Varieties, which I...incipient Species, become ultimately converted into ijood and distinct species, which in most cases obviously differ from each other far more than do the...
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INTELLIGENCE IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS

THOMAS G GENTRY - 1900
...of a bird, in the structure of the beetle that dives through the water, and in the plumed seed that is wafted by the gentlest breeze. In short, we see...everywhere and in every part of the organic world. And yet, how few have paused while admiring these beautiful and wonderful co-adaptations to ask themselves...
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Intelligence in Plants and Animals: Being a New Edition of the Author's ...

Thomas George Gentry - Animal intelligence - 1900 - 489 pages
...of a bird, in the structure of the beetle that dives through the water, and in the plumed seed that is wafted by the gentlest breeze. In short, we see...everywhere and in every part of the organic world. And yet, how few have paused while admiring these beautiful and wonderful co-adaptations to ask themselves...
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Evolution and Adaptation

Thomas Hunt Morgan - Adaptation (Biology). - 1903 - 470 pages
...plainly in the humblest parasite which clings to the hairs of a quadruped or feathers of a bird ; in the structure of the beetle which dives through the water;...by the gentlest breeze ; in short, we see beautiful adaptions everywhere and in every part of the organic world. " Again, it may be asked, how is it that...
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Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Volume 4

Science - 1862
...comparatively few. And this Mr Darwin, with his usual fairness, frankly admits. " It may be asked," says he, " how is it that varieties which I have called incipient...which in most cases obviously differ from each other more than do the varieties of the same species ;" and he sets himself to account for this, but does...
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