Remapping World Cinema: Identity, Culture and Politics in Film

Front Cover
Stephanie Dennison, Song Hwee Lim
Wallflower Press, 2006 - Performing Arts - 203 pages
0 Reviews

With films such as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000), The Motorcycle Diaries (2004), Oldboy (2003) and Good Bye Lenin! (2003), the state and popularity of world cinema has rarely been healthier. Remapping World Cinema explores many of the key critical and theoretical approaches and debates, including race, stardom, post-colonialism as well as national cinemas' relationship with Hollywood. Covering a broad scope, the book examines the cinemas of Africa, East Asia, India, Latin, Central and South America as well as the various territories of Europe.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

REMAPPING WORLD CINEMA IN A POSTWORLD ORDER
9
PERFORMING STARDOM AND RACE
11
Towards a positive definition of world cinema
30
primitivism and paternalism in Pasolini Hopper
55
The dialectics of transnational identity and female desire in four films
73
Carnivalesque meets modernity in the films of Karl Valentin
89
the perverse politics of the Mondo film
118
stardom race
129
replacing
147
questioning gender and sexuality
161
the strange case
188
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2006)

Stephanie Dennison is senior lecturer and with Song Hwee Lim is a director of the Masters programme in World Cinema - the first of its kind - at the University of Leeds. Dennison is the author of a number of articles on Brazilian cinema and the author of a book on popular Brazilian cinema (forthcoming). Lim is currently working on Celluloid Comrades: Male Homosexuality in Contemporary Chinese Cinemas.

Bibliographic information