The Works of Samuel Johnson ...: The Adventurer and Idler

Front Cover
Talboys and Wheeler, 1825

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Contents

On the trades of London
41
Idle hope
46
Apology for neglecting officious advice
52
Incitement to enterprise and emulation Some account of the admirable Crichton
57
Folly of false pretences to importance A journey in a stagecoach
62
Study composition and converse equally necessary to intellectual accomplishment
68
Criticism on the Pastorals of Virgil
73
Apology for apparent plagiarism Sources of literary variety
79
Projectors injudiciously censured and applauded
84
Infelicities of retirement to men of business
89
Different opinions equally plausible
94
On the uncertainty of human things
100
Ill The pleasures and advantages of industry
104
The itch of writing universal
109
The folly of creating artificial wants
114
The miseries of life
119
Solitude not eligible
123
Men differently employed unjustly censured by each other
128
Singularities censured
133
Writers not a useless generation
139
Their happiness and infelicity
144
NUMB PAGE 1 The Idlers character
151
Invitation to correspondents
154
Idlers reason for writing
157
Charities and hospitals
160
Proposal for a female army
163
Ladys performance on horseback
166
Scheme for newswriters
169
Plan of military discipline
172
Progress of idleness
177
Political credulity
179
Discourses on the weather
183
Marriages why advertised
184
The imaginary housewife
187
Robbery of time
192
Treacles complaint of his wife
193
Druggets retirement
196
Expedients of idlers
198
Drugget vindicated
201
Whirlers character
203
Capture of Louisbourg
207
Lingers history of listlessness
210
+22 Imprisonment of debtors
213
Uncertainty of friendship
216
Man does not always think
219
New actors on the stage
221
Betty Brooms history
224
Power of habits
230
Betty Brooms history continued
233
Cruelty shown to debtors in prison 360
261
The art of advertising exemplified
267
Serious reflections on the death of a friend
270
Perditas complaint of her father
273
Monitions on the flight of time
276
The use of memory considered
279
5 On painting Portraits defended
281
Molly Quicks complaint of her mistress
285
Deborah Gingers account of citywits
288
The bustle of idleness described and ridiculed
291
Marvels journey narrated
294
Marvels journey paralleled
297
Domestick greatness unattainable
299
Selfdenial necessary
302
Mischiefs of good company
305
Mrs Savecharges complaint
308
Authors mortifications
312
Virtuosos whimsical
315
Character of Sophron
318
Expectations of pleasure frustrated
322
Books fall into neglect
323
f60 Minim the critic
325
Minim the critic
329
Rangers account of the vanity of riches
332
Progress of arts and language
335
Rangers complaint concluded
338
Fate of posthumous works
341
Loss of ancient writings
343
Scholars journal
349
History of translation
350
History of translation
353
Hard words defended
355
Dick Shifters rural excursion
358
Regulation of memory
362
Tranquils use of riches
365
Memory rarely deficient
367
Gelaleddin of Bassora
370
False criticisms on painting
373
Easy writing
376
Steady Snug Startle Solid and Misty
379
Grand style of painting
383
80 Ladies journey to London
385
Indians speech to his countrymen
388
Scruple Wormwood Sturdy and Gentle
395
Physical evil moral good
411
Sufficiency of the English language
417
Obstructions of learning
425
The good sort of woman
440
+102 Authors inattentive to themselves
446

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Page 378 - Here will I hold. If there's a power above us (And that there is, all Nature cries aloud Through all her works), he must delight in virtue ; And that which he delights in must be happy.
Page 391 - The Italian, attends only to the invariable, the great and general ; ideas which are fixed and inherent in universal nature; the Dutch, on the contrary, to literal truth and a minute exactness in the detail, as I may say, of nature modified by accident. The attention to these petty peculiarities is the very cause of this naturalness so much admired in the Dutch pictures, which, if we suppose it to be a beauty, is certainly...
Page 108 - To strive with difficulties, and to conquer them, is the highest human felicity; the next, is to strive, and deserve to conquer: but he whose life has passed without a contest, and who can boast neither success nor merit, can survey himself only as a useless filler of existence; and if he is content with his own character, must owe his satisfaction to insensibility.
Page 444 - thou to whose voice nations have listened, and whose wisdom is known to the extremities of Asia, tell me how I may resemble Omar the prudent. The arts by which...
Page 97 - Count o'er the joys thine hours have seen, Count o'er thy days from anguish free, And know, whatever thou hast been, 'Tis something better not to be.
Page 385 - What I have had under consideration is the sublimest style, particularly that of Michael Angelo, the Homer of painting. Other kinds may admit of this naturalness, which of the lowest kind is the chief merit ; but in painting, as in poetry, the highest style has the least of common nature.
Page 374 - The remembrance of a few names of painters, with their general characters, with a few rules of the academy, which they may pick up among the painters, will go a great way towards making a very notable connoisseur. With a gentleman of this cast, I visited last week the Cartoons at Hampton-court; he was just returned from Italy, a connoisseur of course, and of course his mouth full of nothing but the grace of Raffaelle, the purity of Domenichino, the learning of Poussin, the air of Guido...
Page 238 - To write news in its perfection requires such a combination of qualities, that a man completely fitted for the task is not always to be found. In Sir Henry Wotton's jocular definition, "An ambassador is said to be a man of virtue sent abroad to tell lies for the advantage of his country ; a newswriter is a man without virtue, who writes lies at home for his own profit.
Page 373 - Critick still worse, who judges by narrow rules, and those too often false, and which though they should be true, and founded on nature, will lead him but a very little way towards the just estimation of the sublime beauties in works of Genius ; for whatever part of an art can be executed or criticised...
Page 356 - That some of them have been adopted by him unnecessarily, may perhaps be allowed ; but in general they are evidently an advantage, for without them his stately ideas would be confined and cramped. "He that thinks with more extent than another, will want words of larger meaning.

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