A Manual of Classical Bibliography: Comprising a Copious Detail of the Various Editions of the Greek and Latin Classics, and of the Critical and Philological Works Published in Illustration of Them, with an Account of the Principal Translations, Into English, French, Italian, Spanish, German, Etc, Volume 1

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Page 472 - The remains of Hesiod, the Ascraean. Translated from the Greek into English verse ; with a preliminary dissertation and notes, by Charles Abraham Elton.
Page 515 - ... nature of the man may account for his whole performance; for he appears from his preface and remarks to have been of an arrogant turn, and an enthusiast in poetry.
Page 517 - I doubt not many have been led into that error by the shortness of it, which proceeds not from his following the original line by line, but from the contractions above mentioned. He sometimes omits whole similes and sentences...
Page 515 - This translation has no other merit than that of being the first appearance of a part of the Iliad in an English dress.
Page 518 - So I complied. I cannot recollect what Mr. Pope allowed for each book of Homer; I have a notion that it was three or four guineas.
Page 517 - As for its being esteemed a close translation, I doubt not, many have been led into that error by the shortness of it, which proceeds not from his following the original, line by line, but from the contractions above mentioned.
Page 22 - beautiful, and one of the most rare of all the Aldine books. The mode in which the Latin and Greek are printed, which is like that of the Lascaris, and of the Carmina of Greg. Nazianzen, had occasioned some confusion among bibliographers; so that the Greek and Latin are sometimes found separately bound up as two distinct editions. This copy of Maittaire's produced twenty shillings.
Page 203 - Harles, Brevior. Not. Litt. Rom. p. 511-12. " This edition has as much literary merit as any of the Dutch editions of the classics in 4to. The notes of other critics are selected with judgment, and the explanatory remarks of Gronovius must give every scholar the most exalted idea of his singular erudition.
Page 35 - Qmitro libros de las fabulas: las extravagantes: otras de la translación de Remigio : las de Aviano ; las collectas de Alfonso y Pogio.
Page 356 - Nor were the two treatises on Friendship and Old Age overlooked. The one was translated by John Harington (1550), the other by Thomas Newton (1569), and both have as handsome an appearance in their English dress as any books of the time; and, in 1561, John Dolman "englysshed these fyve Questions, which Marke Tullye Cicero disputed in his Manor of Tusculanum.

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