The Invention of the Passport: Surveillance, Citizenship and the State

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 13, 1999 - Social Science - 223 pages
This innovative book argues that documents such as passports, internal passports and related mechanisms have been crucial in making distinctions between citizens and noncitizens. It explains how the concept of citizenship has been used over the past 200 years to delineate rights and penalties regarding property, liberty, taxes and welfare. Focusing on the United States and Western Europe, it combines theory and empirical data in questioning how and why states have established the exclusive right to authorize and regulate the movement of people.

What people are saying - Write a review

The invention of the passport: surveillance, citizenship and the state

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

No abstract sociological text, this work is notable for its absence of jargon and its solid grounding in historical fact. Torpey (sociology, Univ. of California, Irvine) analyzes how increasingly ... Read full review

The invention of the passport: surveillance, citizenship and the state

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

No abstract sociological text, this work is notable for its absence of jargon and its solid grounding in historical fact. Torpey (sociology, Univ. of California, Irvine) analyzes how increasingly ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

Bibliographic information