Literary Anecdotes of the Eighteenth Century: Comprizing Biographical Memoirs of William Bowyer, Printer, F.S.A., and Many of His Learned Friends; an Incidental View of the Progress and Advancement of Literature in this Kingdom During the Last Century; and Biographical Anecdotes of a Considerable Number of Eminent Writers and Ingenious Artists; with a Very Copious Index, Volume 3

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corresponde a la descripción del grabado de Watts sobre el autorretrato de rubensn comprado a Brakov por 4,99 pounds

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Page 455 - Wardrobe; and all other my lands, tenements, and hereditaments whatsoever; to have and to hold all and singular the said premises, with their appurtenances, unto the said Susanna Hall, for and during the term of her natural life; and after her decease, to the first son of her body lawfully issuing...
Page 21 - I cannot but conceive him calm and confident, little disappointed, not at all dejected, relying on his own merit with steady consciousness, and waiting, without impatience, the vicissitudes of opinion, and the impartiality of a future generation.
Page 83 - Could all our care elude the gloomy grave, Which claims no less the fearful than the brave, For lust of fame I should not vainly dare In fighting fields, nor urge thy soul to war. But since, alas ! ignoble age must come, Disease, and death's inexorable doom, The life, which others pay, let us bestow, And give to fame what we to nature owe ; Brave though we fall, and honour'd if we live, Or let us glory gain, or glory give!
Page 380 - Wilson ; and throughout he shews himself well read in Stage-Coaches, Country Squires, Inns, and Inns of Court. His reflections upon high people and low people, and misses and masters, are very good.
Page 581 - With regard to the queen's person, a circumstance not to be omitted in writing the history of a female reign, all contemporary authors agree in ascribing to Mary the utmost beauty of countenance and elegance of shape of which the human form is capable.
Page 646 - Of Gilbert Walmsley, thus presented to my mind, let me indulge myself in the remembrance. I knew him very early : he was one of the first friends that literature procured me, and I hope that at least my gratitude made me worthy of his notice. He was of an advanced age, and I was only not a boy; yet he never received my notions with contempt. He was a Whig, with all the virulence and malevolence of his party; yet difference of opinion did not keep us apart. I honoured him, and he endured me.
Page 362 - Pasquin. A Dramatick Satire on the Times : Being the Rehearsal of Two Plays, viz. A Comedy call'd The Election ; and a Tragedy call'd The Life and Death of Common-Sense.
Page 350 - For the promise is to you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the Lord our God shall call
Page 330 - The King to Oxford sent a troop of horse, For Tories own no argument but force ; With equal skill to Cambridge books he sent, For Whigs admit no force but argument.
Page 330 - THE King observing with judicious eyes The state of both his universities, To one he sent a regiment : for why ? That learned body wanted loyalty. To th' other he sent books, as well discerning How much that loyal body wanted learning.

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