Ures̓ Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures and Mines: Containing a Clear Exposition of Their Principles and Practice, Volume 3

Front Cover
Longmans, Green and Company, 1867 - Industrial arts

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 502 - Antiquity, like every other quality that attracts the notice of mankind, has undoubtedly votaries that reverence it, not from reason, but from prejudice. Some seem to admire indiscriminately whatever has been long preserved, without considering that time has sometimes co-operated with chance; all perhaps are more willing to honour past than present excellence; and the mind contemplates genius through the shades of age, as the eye surveys the sun through artificial opacity.
Page 341 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar school; and whereas before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used, and contrary to the King his crown and dignity, thou hast built a paper-mill.
Page 490 - When he had discovered this new art, and printed off a considerable number of copies of the Bible, to imitate those which were commonly sold in MSS., he undertook the sale of them at Paris. It was his interest to conceal this discovery, and to pass off his printed copies for MSS.
Page 464 - ... for a considerable time, walking in a spiral direction from the centre to the circumference, and from the circumference to the centre. In Sweden, and also in China (to judge from the Chinese paintings which represent their manner of making porcelain), the clay is trodden to a uniform mass by oxen. It is afterwards, in all cases, kneaded like baker's dough, by folding back the cake upon itself, and kneading it out, alternately.
Page 37 - Liebig, on some important points ; sad more especially, in relation to his so-called " mineral theory," which is embodied in the following sentence, to be found at page 211 of the third edition of his work on Agricultural Chemistry, where he says " the crops on a field diminish or increase in exact proportion to the diminution or increase of the mineral substances conveyed to it in manure.
Page 500 - The terms folio, quarto, octavo, duodecimo, etc., indicate the number of leaves into which a sheet of paper is folded. A sheet folded in 2 leaves is called a Folio.
Page 381 - ... clouds and mists resting on the summits and sides of mountains, amply supply their surface with moisture, which comes, too, in the most favourable form for vegetation, not in a sudden torrent, but unceasingly and gently drop by drop. The extent of such bogs is also affected by the nature of the rocks below them. On quartz they are shallow and small ; on any rock yielding by its decomposition a clayey coating they are considerable...
Page 515 - ... to be put in motion, and to make a complete revolution, the type form will be pressed successively against each of the eight cylinders, and if the type were previously inked, and each of the eight cylinders supplied with paper, eight sheets of paper would he printed in one revolution of the drum.
Page 436 - The rotation of a principal shaft mounted with several cams, gives motion to various sliders, levers, and wheels, which work the different parts. A slider pushes pincers forwards, which draw wire from a reel, at every rotation of the shaft, and advance such a length of wire as will produce one pin. A dye cuts ofFthe said length of wire by the descent of its upper chap; the chap then opens a carrier, which takes the pin to the pointing apparatus.
Page 492 - Scriptures ; and yet, so great was the rush to this new supply of the most important knowledge, that we have existing 326 editions of the English Bible, or parts of the Bible, printed between 1526 and 1600. The early English printers did not attempt what the continental ones were doing for the ancient classics. Down to 1540 no Greek book had appeared from an English press. Oxford had only printed a part of Cicero's Epistles ; Cambridge, no ancient writer whatever : only three or four old Roman writers...

Bibliographic information