Protestants and Pictures: Religion, Visual Culture, and the Age of American Mass Production

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Oxford University Press, Aug 26, 1999 - Religion - 432 pages
In this lavishly illustrated book, David Morgan surveys the visual culture that shaped American Protestantism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries--a vast record of images in illustrated bibles, Christian almanacs, children's literature, popular religious books, charts, broadsides, Sunday school cards, illuminated devotional items, tracts, chromos, and engravings. His purpose is to explain the rise of these images, their appearance and subject matter, how they were understood by believers, the uses to which they were put, and what their relation was to technological innovations, commerce, and the cultural politics of Protestantism. His overarching argument is that the role of images in American Protestantism greatly expanded and developed during this period.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Media Millennium Nationhood
13
THE MILLENNIAL MISSION OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC
41
ADVENTISM AND IMAGES OF THE END
121
VISUAL PEDAGOGY
199
THE RISE OF THE DEVOTIONAL IMAGE IN AMERICAN PROTESTANTISM
263
The Return of Aura
339
Notes
349
Bibliography
393
Index
407

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