Samuel Johnson

Front Cover
Harper & Brothers, 1887 - Authors, English - 195 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 43 - is recommended to the public, were written by your lordship. To be so distinguished, is an honour, which, being very little accustomed to favours from the great, I know not well how to receive, or in what terms to acknowledge.
Page 106 - There are few ways in which a man can be more innocently employed than in getting money.
Page 44 - Having carried on my work thus far with so little obligation to any favourer of learning, I shall not be disappointed though I should conclude it, if less be possible, with less; for I have been long wakened from that dream of hope, in which I once boasted myself with so much exultation, My Lord, Your Lordship's most humble Most obedient servant, SAM. JOHNSON.
Page 44 - I hope it is no very cynical asperity not to confess obligations where no benefit has been received, or to be unwilling that the public should consider me as owing that to a patron, which Providence has enabled me to do for myself.
Page 176 - For we were nursed upon the self-same hill, Fed the same flock by fountain, shade, and rilL Together both, ere the high lawns...
Page 182 - Condemn'da needy supplicant to wait, While ladies interpose, and slaves debate. But did not chance at length her error mend ? Did no subverted empire mark his end ? Did rival monarchs give the fatal wound ? Or hostile millions press him to the ground ? His fall was destined to a barren strand, A petty fortress, and a dubious hand ; He left the name, at which the world grew pale, To point a moral, or adorn a tale.
Page 183 - Implore his aid, in his decisions rest, Secure whate'er he gives, he gives the best Yet, when the sense of sacred presence fires, And strong devotion to the skies aspires, Pour forth...
Page 182 - The march begins in military state, And nations on his eye suspended wait : Stern Famine guards the solitary coast, And Winter barricades the realms of Frost : He comes : nor want nor cold his course delay. — Hide, blushing glory, hide Pultowa's day.
Page 167 - He must write as the interpreter of nature, and the legislator of mankind, and consider himself as presiding over the thoughts and manners of future generations ; as a being superior to time and place.
Page 57 - You are a philosopher, Dr. Johnson. I have tried too in my time to be a philosopher; but, I don't know how, cheerfulness was always breaking in.

Bibliographic information