Cold War Broadcasting: Impact on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe : a Collection of Studies and Documents

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A. Ross Johnson, R. Eugene Parta
Central European University Press, Jan 1, 2010 - Performing Arts - 584 pages
"It was not a matter of propaganda ... black and white ideological broadcasts ... What made [Radio Free Europe] important were its impartiality, independence, and objectivity."---Vaclav Havel

"Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty were critically important weapons in the free world's competition with Soviet totalitarianism---and without them the Soviet bloc might even have not disintegrated ... The account in this book of their activities is therefore not only informative, but critical to understanding recent history."---Zbigniew Brzezinski

"The studies and translated Soviet bloc documents published in this book demonstrate the enormous impact of Radio Free Europe, Radio Liberty, and Voice of America during the Cold War. By promoting democratic values and undermining the monopoly of information on which Communist regimes relied, the Radios contributed greatly to the end of the Cold War."---George P. Shultz

"I know of no other mass media organization that has done more than RFE/RL to help create the Europe in which we live today---a Europe not divided into two opposing camps."---Elena Bonner

Examines the role of Western broadcasting to the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe during the Cold War, with a focus on Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty. It includes chapters by radio veterans and by scholars who have conducted research on the subject in once-secret Soviet bloc archives and in Western records. It also contains a selection of translated documents from formerly secret Soviet and East European archives, most of them published here for the first time.
 

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Contents

RFE s Early Years Evolution of Broadcast Policy and Evidence of Broadcast Impact
3
Goals of Radio Liberty
17
The Voice of America A Brief Cold War History
25
JAMMING AND AUDIENCES
49
Cold War Radio Jamming
51
Types of Jamming
64
An Example of a Shortwave Broadcasting StationDuring the Cold War
65
The Audience to Western Broadcasts to the USSRDuring the Cold War An External Perspective
67
CONCLUSIONS
343
Cold War International Broadcasting and the Roadto Democracy
345
DOCUMENTS FROM EAST EUROPEAN ANDSO VIET AR CHIVES
351
I Regime Perceptions of Western Broadcasters
355
Bulgaria
357
German Democratic Republic
366
Hungary
368
Romania
391

The Foreign Radio Audience in the USSR Duringthe Cold War An Internal Perspective
103
The Audience to Western Broadcasts to Poland During the Cold War
121
Weekly Listening Rates for Major Western Broadcasters to Poland Hungary Czechoslovakia Romania Bulgaria and the USSR During the Cold War
142
IMPACT OF WESTERN BROADCASTS IN EASTERN EUROPE
145
Radio Free Europe in the Eyes of the Polish Communist Elite
147
Polish Regime Countermeasures against Radio Free Europe
169
Radio Free Europes Impact in Romania During the Cold War
205
Ceauşescus War against Our Ears
229
Just Noise? Impact of Radio Free Europe in Hungary
239
Bulgarian Regime Countermeasures against Radio Free Europe
259
IM PACT OF WESTERN BROADCASTS IN THE USSR
275
Soviet Reactions to Foreign Broadcasting in the 1950s
277
Foreign Media the Soviet Western Frontier and the Hungarian and Czechoslovak Crises
299
Water Shaping the Rock Cold War Broadcasting Impact in Latvia
319
Poland
394
USSR
409
Soviet Bloc
441
Bulgaria
469
Czechoslovakia
476
Hungary
487
Poland
501
USSR
520
Contributors
563
Glossary
565
Index
569
Back cover
585
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

A. Ross Johnson, former director of RFE and the RFE/RL Research Institute. Research fellow at the Hoover Institution and senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
R. Eugene Parta, former director of Soviet Area Audience and Opinion Research at RFE/RL and of Media and Opinion Research at the RFE/RL Research Institute.

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