Thiers' History of the consulate, and empire of Napoleon, tr. by W. Stapleton

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Page 49 - How can the two most enlightened nations of Europe, powerful and strong beyond what their safety and independence require, sacrifice to ideas of vain greatness the benefits of commerce, internal prosperity, and the happiness of families...
Page 7 - Happy fortune of youth! If, fifteen years later, the First Consul, now so well seconded by his generals, had found a Desaix on the battle-field of Waterloo, he would have preserved the empire and France its ruling position amongst the powers of Europe.
Page 367 - BulU are granted for the consecration of Bishops, the promotion of benefices, the celebration of jubilees, &c. Those brought into France are limited by the law and customs of the land, nor are they admitted, till they have been examined, and found to contain nothing contrary to the liberties of the Gallican church.
Page 340 - ... short time ; for in 1184 its walls were razed by Yakub, and it followed the political condition of Tunis, and was subject to its kings. From this time until its conquest, about 1510, by the Spaniards, Tripoli is scarcely mentioned by historical writers. In 1530 the emperor Charles V. ceded it, with the island of Malta, to the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem, after their expulsion from Rhodes. Its only strength was then a castle, which they engaged to keep and to hold in defence of Christendom...
Page 6 - M-hen his mind was engaged by such mighty interests, is worthy of attention. If there were nothing in it but a mere conqueror's caprice, dispensing at random good or evil, alternately overthrowing empires or rearing a cottage, it may be useful to record such caprices, if only to tempt the masters of the earth to imitation ; but such an act reveals something more. The human soul, in those moments when it is filled with ardent desires, is disposed to kindness ; it does...
Page 94 - ... vegetation. However, about Carrara they make up for the want of external decorations by the valuable quarries of marble, so .well known, and now, as anciently, so highly valued by sculptors and architects. We passed along under a fine breeze, and about five o'clock in the evening of a delightful day entered the harbour of Genoa. This harbour is in the form of an ampitheatre : Genoa occupies one side, and spreads her streets and churches, and then her suburbs and villas, over a vast semicircular...
Page 91 - ... conducts to a staircase, each step of which is formed of a single block of Carrara marble. A large antichamber then leads to ten saloons, either opening into one another, or communicating by spacious galleries. These saloons are all on a grand scale in all their proportions, adorned with pictures and busts, and fitted up with prodigious richness both in decorations and furniture. One of them surpasses in the splendour of its gildings any thing of the kind I believe in Europe. These...
Page 94 - ... range, and covering the hills that command the city, forms a circumference of thirteen miles. The interior fortification terminates in a point beyond the summit of the hill, and is supposed or rather proved by late experience to be of very considerable strength. As we rode round these extensive works, we were amused partly by the contrast of the bleak barren hills that rose above us, with the...
Page 247 - The responsibility of this measure," said Napoleon, " must rest with the legislative body. The consuls are irresponsible. But the ministers are not. Any one of them who should sign an arbitrary decree, might hereafter be called to account. Not a single individual must be compromised. The consuls themselves know not what may happen. As for me, while I live, I am not afraid that any one will dare to call me to account for my actions.
Page 158 - ... resembling, in some respects, the architectural pictures of Prout and Canaletti. Having crossed this open space, the only one worth mentioning in all Cairo, we plunged into the narrow, tortuous streets leading to the Frank quarter, through so motley a crowd as no other city, perhaps, in the world could have supplied : — Arabs, Jews, Armenians, Copts, Turks, Negroes, Germans, Poles, Italians, French, English, Greeks, — all in their national dresses, — red, blue, yellow, green, gray, black,...

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