The Scientific and Literary Treasury: A New and Popular Encyclopedia of the Belles Lettres

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1843 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 832 pages
 

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Page 163 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the Gospel, and the Protestant reformed religion established by law ; and will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them ? ' King or queen :
Page 163 - And will you preserve unto the bishops and " clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to " their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do " or shall appertain unto them, or any of them ? — King " or queen. All this I promise to do.
Page 163 - Will you solemnly promise and swear to govern the people of this kingdom of England, and the dominions thereto belonging, according to the statutes in parliament agreed on, and the laws and customs of the same?
Page 248 - Equity, then, in its true and genuine meaning, is the soul and spirit of all law: positive law is construed, and rational law is made, by it. In this, equity is synonymous to justice ; in that, to the true sense and sound interpretation of the rule.
Page 406 - A fire devoureth before them; and behind them a flame burneth: the land is as the garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness; yea, and nothing shall escape them.
Page 275 - In the reciprocal services of lord and vassal there was ample scope for every magnanimous and disinterested energy. The heart of man, when placed in circumstances which have a tendency to excite them, will seldom be deficient in such sentiments.
Page 406 - They shall run like mighty men; they shall climb the wall like men of war; and they shall march every one on his ways, and they shall not break their ranks...
Page 167 - The court-leet, or view of frankpledge,(x) which is a court of record, held once in the year, and not oftener,(^) within a particular hundred, lordship, or manor, before the steward of the leet: being the king's court, granted by charter to the lords of those hundreds or manors.
Page 257 - I say, then, that we have the knowledge of our own existence by intuition; of the existence of God by demonstration; and of other things by sensation.
Page 315 - A Circle is a plane figure bounded by a curve line, called the Circumference, which is every where equidistant from a certain point within, called its Centre.

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