Knowledge is Power: A View of the Productive Forces of Modern Society, and the Results of Labour, Capital, and Skill

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J. Murray, 1859 - Capitalism - 423 pages
 

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Page 362 - Then he that had received the five talents went and traded with the same, and made them other five talents. And likewise he that had received two, he also gained other two. But he that had received one went and digged in the earth, and hid his lord's money.
Page 72 - The property which every man has in his own labour, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable.
Page 159 - Thou didst swear to me upon a parcel-gilt goblet, sitting in my Dolphin-chamber, at the round table, by a sea-coal fire, upon Wednesday in Wheeson week, when the prince broke thy head for liking his father to a singingman of Windsor, thou didst swear to me then, as I was washing thy wound, to marry me and make me my lady thy wife.
Page 63 - Of mimic'd statesmen and their merry king. No wit to flatter left of all his store! No fool to laugh at, which he valued more. There, victor of his health, of fortune, friends, And fame, this lord of useless thousands ends.
Page 100 - And hang their heads with sorrow. Good grows with her; In her days every man shall eat in safety Under his own vine what he plants, and sing The merry songs of peace to all his neighbours.
Page 11 - Handbook of Architecture. Being a Concise and Popular Account of the Different Styles prevailing in all Ages and Countries in the World. With a Description of the most remarkable Buildings.
Page 212 - Here strip, my children! here at once leap in, Here prove who best can dash through thick and thin, And who the most in love of dirt excel, Or dark dexterity of groping well.
Page 191 - So doth the potter sitting at his work, And turning the wheel about with his feet, Who is alway carefully set at his work, And maketh all his work by number; He fashioneth the clay with his arm, And boweth down his strength before his feet; He applieth himself to lead it over; And he is diligent to make clean the furnace : All these trust to their hands: And every one is wise in his work.
Page 92 - Now have we many chimneys ; and yet our tenderlings complain of rheums, catarrhs, and poses ; then had we none but reredosses, and our heads did never ache. For as the smoke in those days was supposed to be a sufficient hardening for the timber of the house, so it was reputed a far better medicine to keep the good-man and his family from the quack or pose, wherewith, as then, very few were acquainted.
Page 362 - And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one ; to every man according to his several ability; and straightway 1 6 took his journey.

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