The Book of the Boudoir, Volume 1

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H. Colburn, 1829 - English fiction - 662 pages
 

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Page 50 - Biron they call him ; but a merrier man. Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth-moving jest...
Page 124 - ... vanished. I remembered that his wife carried on some little trade in the old town ; I remembered even the house and flat she occupied, which I had often visited in my boyhood. Having made it out, I found the old woman in widow's mourning. Her husband had been dead for some months, and had told her, on his death-bed, that my father's steward had wronged him of some money ; but that when Master Tom returned he would see her righted.
Page viii - O'Briens' was going through the press, Mr. Colburn was sufficiently pleased with the subscription (as it is called in the trade) to the first edition, to desire a new work from the author. I was just setting off for Ireland, the horses literally putting-to—when Mr.
Page 110 - Mr. Kemble was evidently much pre-occupied, and a little exalted ; and he appeared actuated by some intention, which he had the will, but not the power, to execute. He was seated...
Page 123 - I was descending the steps of a close, or coming out from a bookseller's shop, I met our old family butler. He looked greatly changed, pale, wan, and shadowy as a ghost. " Eh! old boy," I said, "what brings you here ?" He replied, " To meet your honour, and solicit your interference with my lord, to recover a sum due to me, which the steward...
Page 100 - English tan, without time to go through the necessary course of training in manners or millinery, for such an awful transition : so, with no chaperon but my incipient notoriety, and actually no toilet but the frock and...
Page 109 - I had got into a very delightful conversation with my veteran beaux, when Mr. Kemble was announced. Lady C k reproached him as " the late Mr. Kemble ;" and then, looking significantly at me, told him who I was. Kemble, to whom I had been already presented by Mrs. Lefanu, acknowledged me by a kindly nod; but the intense stare which succeeded, was not one of mere recognition. It was the glazed, fixed look, so common to those who have been making libations to altars which rarely qualify them for ladies
Page 104 - ... of a salon. As we stood wedged on the threshold of fashion my dazzled eyes rested for a moment on a strikingly sullen-looking handsome creature, whose boyish person was distinguished by an air of singularity, which seemed to vibrate between hauteur and shyness. He stood with his arms crossed, and alone, occupying a corner near the door, and though in the brilliant bustling crowd, was 'not of it.
Page 111 - C k), and, reading, with his deep emphatic voice, one of the most high-flown of its passages, he paused, and patting the page with his fore-finger, with the look of 'Hamlet' addressing ' Polonius,' he said, 'Little girl, -why did you write such nonsense ? and where did you get all these dd hard words ? ' Thus taken by surprise, and ' smarting with my wounds ' of mortified authorship, I answered unwittingly and witlessly, the truth : ' Sir, I wrote as well as I could, and I got the hard words out...
Page 125 - I remember you having expressed your approbation of my style of writing, and a wish that I would lose no occasion of rendering it useful. I wish I could agree with your ladyship in your kind and partial opinion ; but, as there never was an occasion in which it can be more useful to excite popular feeling than in the cause of the Greeks, I send your ladyship a copy of the second edition, published a few days ago. "With regard and esteem, &c. &c. E. " No. 13, Arabella Row, Pimlico, London, October...

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