Sketches of Louisville and Its Environs: Including a Florula Louisvillensis

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G. R. Clark Press, 1819 - Botany - 270 pages

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Page 201 - French, under his patent, and owned by a company at that place. She made two voyages to Louisville in the summer of 1814, under the command of Captain J. Gregg. On the 1st...
Page 201 - ... Daniel French, on his patent, and owned by a company at that place. She made two voyages to Louisville in the summer of 1814, under the command of Capt.
Page 115 - ... Main street, been laid off so as to have extended 90 feet from the brink of the second bank, forming an avenue front of the town, and had no houses been permitted to exist north of that avenue those to the south all fronting it, and of course the river, Louisville would have exhibited a coup d'oeil, surpassed, in point of beauty, by few in the world. As it is, the town has turned its back upon the varied and interesting prospect presented by the Ohio and its Falls...
Page 149 - Jist complete. To affirm that Louisville is a healthy city, would be absurd, but it is much more so than the thousand tongues of fame would make us believe, and as many of the causes which prevent it from becoming perfectly so, can be removed, a few years hence may find the favorable alterations accomplished, and do away the general impression of its being the grave yard of the western country.
Page 119 - tis true, but within whose magic round abounds every pleasure that wealth, regulated by taste, or urbanity can bestow. There the 'red heel' of Versailles may imagine himself in the emporium of fashion, and whilst leading beauty through the mazes of the dance, forget that he is in the wilds of America.
Page 201 - ... Sailed from Pittsburgh for New Orleans in March 1815, under the command of Captain A. Gale, made the voyage, and then went into the Natchez trade — was commanded by Captain R. De Hart who made six voyages in her, and then again by Captain Gale.
Page 201 - ... 624 miles. For some time after, she was actively engaged in transporting troops. She made one voyage to the gulf of Mexico as a cartel, one voyage to the rapids of Red river with troops, and nine voyages to Natchez. She...
Page 160 - is situated two miles below Louisville, immediately at the foot of the rapids, and is built upon the beautiful plain or bottom which commences at the mouth of Beargrass Creek, through which, under the brow of the second bank, the contemplated canal will in all probability be cut. The town originally consisted of forty-five acres, but it has since received considerable additions. The lots are 75 by...

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