Han Feizi: Basic Writings

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Columbia University Press, May 14, 2003 - Philosophy - 160 pages
Trenchant, sophisticated, and cynical, Han Feizi has been read in every age and is still of interest today when people are more than ever concerned with the nature and use of power. Han Feizi (280?-233 B.C.), a prince of Han, was a representative of the Fa-chia, or Legalist, school of philosophy and produced the final and most readable exposition of its theories. His handbook for the ruler deals with the problems of strengthening and preserving the state, the way of the ruler, the use of power, and punishment and favor. Ironically, the ruler most influenced by Han Feizi, the king of Qin, eventually sent Han Feizi to prison, where he later committed suicide.
 

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bacic version of real one

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This version of the Han Feizi is meant primarily for those who want to start reading his texts. I recommend this for beginners in Chinese legalism. Furthermore, this can be used as a supplementary text for other versions of Han Feizi. If you are looking for a version at an academic level, then I recommend using a text translated by Van Norden or PJ Ivanhoe. 

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About the author (2003)

Burton Watson is one of the world's best-known translators from the Chinese and Japanese. He received the PEN translation prize in 1981. His translations include The Lotus Sutra, The Vimalakirti Sutra, Ryokan: Zen Monk-Poet of Japan, Saigyo: Poems of a Mountain Home, and The Columbia Book of Chinese Poetry: From Early Times to the Thirteenth Century, all published by Columbia. This book presents Watson's renowned translation of a Chinese philosophy classic in pinyin romanization for the first time.

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