Woodrow Wilson and the Press: Prelude to the Presidency

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Springer, Jan 16, 2004 - History - 315 pages
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Esteemed journalism historian James Startt has crafted an intriguing case study of the relationship between political leadership and the mass media during its early days, using the political ascendancy of Woodrow Wilson as its focus. Wilson's emergence as a major political figure coincided with the arrival of a real mass media and a more independent, less partisan style of political coverage. While most Nineteenth-century presidents remained aloof from the press, Wilson understood it could no longer be ignored: 'The public man who fights the daily press won't be a public man very long'.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Early Encounters with Journalism
1
Chapter 2 The President of Princeton and the Press 190210
19
Chapter 3 Advent of a Public Statesman 190610
41
Chapter 4 Wilsons Gubernatorial Campaign and the Press
67
Chapter 5 Governor Wilson and the Press 191011
93
Publicity and Opposition
117
Chapter 7 The Press and Wilsons Preconvention Campaign
143
Chapter 8 Wilson and the Press at the Democratic Convention and Afterward
175
Chapter 9 Wilsons Election Campaign of 1912 and the Press
197
Chapter 10 On the Threshold of the White House
229
Key to Abbreviations in Notes
245
Notes
247
Bibliography
289
Index
307
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About the author (2004)

JAMES D. STARTT is Senior Research Professor in History at Valparaiso University, Indiana, USA. He is co-editor of The Media in American History and is co-author of Historical Methods in Mass Communication. He served as president of the American Journalism Historians Association in 1997-98.

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