Relativistic Quantum Theory of Atoms and Molecules: Theory and Computation

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 15, 2007 - Science - 800 pages
0 Reviews

Relativistic quantum electrodynamics, which describes the electromagneticinteractions of electrons and atomic nuclei, provides the basis for modeling the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and solids and of their interactions with photons and other projectiles. The theory underlying the widely used GRASP relativistic atomic structure program, the DARC electron-atom scattering code and the new BERTHA relativistic molecular structure program is presented in depth, together with computational aspects relevant to practical calculations. Along with an understanding of the physics and mathematics, the reader will gain some idea of how to use these programs to predict energy levels, ionization energies, electron affinities, transition probabilities, hyperfine effects and other properties of atoms and molecules.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Relativity in atomic and molecular physics
3
Relativistic wave equations for free particles 63
61
References
119
The Dirac Equation
121
Quantum electrodynamics
181
Computational atomic and molecular structure
208
References
253
References
322
References
529
References
584
References
624
References
664
Relativistic symmetry orbitals for double point groups
717
Finite difference methods for Dirac equations
733
Eigenfunction expansions for the radially reduced Dirac
757
Iterative processes in nonlinear systems of equations
769

References
391
References
431
References
467
Construction of E coefficients
777
References
783
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Professor Grant first became aware of the need to develop a relativistic theory of atomic and molecular structure some 50 years ago in connection with X-ray absorption by heavy metals. In a 1961 paper, he showed that the Dirac-Hartree-Fock equations for atoms could be written in a simple form which has been used in all subsequent atomic calculations. This early work was generalized to permit more accurate multi-configurational calculations in the next two decades, implemented in the widely used GRASP code for relativistic modeling of electronic wavefunctions, energy levels and radiative transition probabilities of spectral lines. The DARC code, an extension of GRASP which is designed to calculate cross sections for atom/ion collisions with low-energy electrons or photons, was developed mainly in the 1980s and is now becoming more relevant for applications involving target atoms of higher atomic number. The BERTHA code is the first relativistic molecular structure code designed to take advantage of the internal structure of Dirac four-component spinors; its speed and accuracy are now beginning to be appreciated and utilized effectively by quantum chemists. The book is designed for all those who would like to know more about the mathematics and physics of relativistic atomic and molecular theory and who wish to use the computational machinery now available to solve problems in atomic and molecular physics and their applications.

Professor Grant was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of London in 1992.

Bibliographic information