History of the Borough of Liskeard and Its Vicinity

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Cash, 1856 - Liskeard (England) - 564 pages
 

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Page 545 - George the Third by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth, To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting: Know ye, that we of our special grace, certain knowledge and mere motion, have given and granted, and...
Page 545 - Confessor, have granted and given license, for us and our heirs, as much as in us is, to our beloved...
Page 331 - TOLERATION. 331 of their respective places,) with which we are pleased to dispense in this behalf; and for so doing, this shall be your warrant. And so we bid you farewell. Given at our Court at Whitehall, the 26th day at June, 1688, in the fourth year of our reign.
Page 138 - England and their successors to their only proper use and behoof for evermore to be holden of us, our heirs and successors as of our manor of East Greenwich, in the County of Kent, by fealty only in free and common socage...
Page 362 - In times past, the Cornish people gave themselves principally (and in a manner wholly) to the seeking of tin, and neglected husbandry ; so as the neighbours of Devon and Somerset shires hired their pastures at a rent, and stored them with their own cattle. As for tillage, it came far short of feeding the inhabitants...
Page 83 - I have engaged unto you the word of a king, that you, joining with me in that blessed work, I shall give both to you and your army such eminent marks of my confidence and value, as shall not leave a room for the least distrust...
Page 100 - is one of the most extraordinary and instructive narratives in the world, which no reader of competent judgment can peruse without revering the virtue of the writer...
Page 537 - Hugh, and others our liegemen have, in the first place, granted to God, and by this our present charter confirmed, for us and our heirs for ever: 1.
Page 82 - Let us do this, and if any be so foolishly unnatural as to oppose their King's, their country's, and their own good, we will make them happy, by God's blessing, even against their wills. To this, the only impediment can be, want of mutual confidence. I promise it to you on my part; and as I have endeavoured to prepare it on yours by my letter to Hertford from Evesham...

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