Anniversary Papers by Colleagues and Pupils of George Lyman Kittredge: Presented on the Completion of His Twenty-fifth Year of Teaching in Harvard University, June, MCMXIII.

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Ginn, 1913 - Philology - 462 pages
 

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Page 438 - There was therefore before the time of Dryden no poetical diction, no system of words at once refined from the grossness of domestic use, and free from the harshness of terms appropriated to particular arts. Words too familiar, or too remote, defeat the purpose of a poet. From those sounds which we hear on small or on coarse occasions, we do not easily receive strong impressions, or delightful images ; and words to which we are nearly strangers, whenever they occur, draw that attention on themselves...
Page 438 - Lord my pasture shall prepare, And feed me with a shepherd's care ; His presence shall my wants supply, And guard me with a watchful eye : My noon-day walks he shall attend, And all my midnight hours defend.
Page 60 - I then kissed her. She told me that to part was the greatest pain that she had ever felt, and that she hoped we should meet again in a better place. I expressed, with swelled eyes, and great emotion of tenderness, the same hopes. We kissed, and parted. I humbly hope...
Page 264 - Now, whether it be Bestial oblivion or some craven scruple Of thinking too precisely on the event, — A thought which, quarter'd, hath but one part wisdom And ever three parts coward, — I do not know Why yet I live to say, "This thing's to do," Sith I have cause, and will, and strength, and means To do't.
Page 440 - The business of a poet," said Imlac, "is to examine, not the individual, but the species ; to remark general properties and large appearances ; he does not number the streaks of the tulip, or describe the different shades in the verdure of the forest.
Page 253 - Begin, ye tormentors! your threats are in vain, For the son of Alknomook shall never complain. Remember the arrows he shot from his bow; Remember your chiefs by his hatchet laid low: Why so slow? — do you wait till I shrink from the pain? No — the son of Alknomook will never complain.
Page 328 - I have followed all the antique Poets historicall; first Homere, who in the Persons of Agamemnon and Ulysses hath ensampled a good governour and a vertuous man, the one in his Ilias, the other in his Odysseis...
Page 271 - And let me speak, to the yet unknowing world, How these things came about : so shall you hear Of carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts ; Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters ; Of deaths put on by cunning and forc'd cause : And, in this upshot, purposes mistook Fall'n on the inventors' heads : all this can I Truly deliver.
Page 87 - ... a pursuit of our total perfection by means of getting to know, on all the matters which most concern us, the best which has been thought and said in the world...
Page 328 - Ulysses hath ensampled a good governour and a vertuous man, the one in his Ilias, the other in his Odysseis: then Virgil, whose like intention was to doe in the person of...

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