An Inland Voyage, Including Travels with a Donkey

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Cosimo, Inc., May 1, 2006 - Travel - 360 pages
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We stowed the canoes in a granary, and asked among the children for a guide. The circle at once widened round us, and our offers of reward were received in dispiriting silence. We were plainly a pair of Bluebeards to the children; they might speak to us in public places, and where they had the advantage of numbers; but it was another thing to venture off alone with two uncouth and legendary characters, who had dropped from the clouds upon their hamlet this quiet afternoon, sashed and beknived, and with a flavor of great voyages.-from "Pont-sur-Sambre: We Are Peddlers"The sly wit and keenly observant eye that makes Robert Louis Stevenson a continuing favorite with readers is in full force in this 1913 volume, a compilation of two of the writer's least known but most purely enjoyable works. In 1876, Stevenson canoed through Belgium and France with his friend, Sir Walter Simpson, an exploit that resulted in the delightful An Inland Voyage; two years later, he took a walking tour of the C vannes, which became Travels with a Donkey. More that just wonderfully escapist, these essays offer a glimpse into the mind and memories of an author's imagination, and serve as a vital psychological backdrop for the tales of adventure, romance, and horror related in Stevenson's fiction.OF INTEREST TO: Stevenson fans, armchair travelers, readers of classic British literatureAlso available from Cosimo Classics: Stevenson's Across the Plains: With Other Memories and Essays.
 

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Contents

I
xxxvii
II
6
III
12
IV
18
V
23
VI
29
VII
36
VIII
41
XXIV
135
XXV
151
XXVI
161
XXVII
171
XXVIII
6
XXIX
16
XXX
27
XXXI
39

IX
46
X
51
XI
56
XII
65
XIII
72
XIV
79
XV
84
XVI
90
XVII
98
XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
119
XXII
130
XXIII
133
XXXII
47
XXXIII
53
XXXIV
62
XXXV
71
XXXVI
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XXXVII
85
XXXVIII
91
XXXIX
98
XL
109
XLI
118
XLII
126
XLIII
132
XLIV
135
XLV
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Page xxv - Kidnapped; being memoirs of the adventures of David Balfour...
Page xvii - UNDER the wide and starry sky, Dig the grave and let me lie. Glad did I live and gladly die, And I laid me down with a will. This be the verse you grave for me: Here he lies where he longed to be, Home is the sailor, home from sea, And the hunter home from the hill.
Page 14 - To know what you prefer, instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive.

About the author (2006)

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886. With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much. Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

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