The Tatler; corrected from the originals, with a preface, historical and biographical, by A. Chalmers

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Alexander Chalmers
1817
 

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Page 44 - So when an angel, by divine command, With rising tempests shakes a guilty land (Such as of late o'er pale Britannia passed), Calm and serene he drives the furious blast; And pleased the Almighty's orders to perform, Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm.
Page 292 - Here Love his golden shafts employs, here lights His constant lamp, and waves his purple wings, Reigns here and revels...
Page 248 - The diseased have ye not strengthened, neither have ye healed that which was sick, neither have ye bound up that which was broken, neither have ye brought again that which was driven away, neither have ye sought that which was lost ; but with force and with cruelty have ye ruled them.
Page 291 - Hail, wedded Love, mysterious law, true source Of human offspring, sole propriety In Paradise of all things common else! By thee adulterous Lust was driven from men Among the bestial herds to range ; by thee, Founded in reason, loyal, just, and pure, Relations dear, and all the charities Of father, son, and brother, first were known.
Page 302 - ... before us seemed to vanish. Most of the company, who had swords in their hands, marched on with great spirit, and an air of defiance, up the road that was commanded by Death; while others, who had thought and contemplation in their looks, went forward, in a more composed manner, up the road possessed by Envy. The way above these apparitions grew...
Page 202 - This art of his is used with the most exact and honest skill: he never attempts your passions till he has convinced your reason. All the objections which he can form are laid open and dispersed, before he uses the least vehemence in his sermon ; but when he thinks he has your head, he very soon wins your heart : and never pretends to show the beauty of holiness, till he hath convinced you of the truth of it.
Page 301 - ... others telescopes, and others pencils; some had laurels on their heads, and others buskins on their legs : in short, there was scarce any instrument of a mechanic art or liberal science which was not made use of on this occasion. My good...
Page 306 - ... The next man astonished the whole table with his appearance. He was slow, solemn, and silent in his behaviour, and wore a raiment curiously wrought with hieroglyphics. As he came into the middle of the room, he threw back the skirt of it, and discovered a golden thigh. Socrates, at the sight of it, declared against keeping company with any who were not made of flesh and blood ; and, therefore, desired Diogenes the Laertian to lead him to the apartment allotted for fabulous heroes, and worthies...
Page 74 - Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone, Drew Priam's curtain in the dead of night, And would have told him half his Troy was burn'd; But Priam found the fire ere he his tongue, And I my Percy's death ere thou report'st it.
Page 102 - Juv. Sat. i. 85, 86. Whate'er men do, or say, or think, or dream, Our motley paper seizes for its theme.

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