A Compendious System of Natural Philosophy: With Notes, Containing the Mathematical Demonstrations, and Some Occasional Remarks. In Four Parts, Volume 1

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S. Harding, 1744 - Astronomy
 

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Page 23 - This amounts to the same with saying, that, in the case before us, the sine of the angle of incidence is to the sine of the angle of refraction in a given ratio.
Page 97 - In foul weather, when the mercury rises much and high, and so continues for two or three days before the foul weather is quite over, then expect a continuance of fair weather to follow.
Page vi - When a ray of light passes from one medium to another, it is refracted so that the ratio of the sine of the angle of incidence to the sine of the angle of refraction is equal to the ratio of the velocities in the two media.
Page 97 - ... 1. The rising of the mercury presages, in general, fair weather, and its falling foul 'weather, as rain, snow, high winds, and storms.
Page 79 - ... which being once filled, all the overplus of water that comes thither runs over by the lowest place, and breaking out by the sides of the hills forms single springs...
Page 91 - ... high, as long as the winds continue fo to blow; and then the air being fpecifically heavier, the vapours are better...
Page 89 - Oblervations at St. Helena^ make very little or no Variation of the Height of the Mercury in all Weathers. Hence I conceive, that the principal...
Page 121 - In some places the time of the change is attended with calms, in others with variable winds. And it often happens on the...
Page 98 - That it is not fo much the height of the mercury in the tube that indicates the weather, as the motion of it up and down: wherefore...
Page 148 - ... reddish Cloud was swiftly propagated along the Northern Horizon, into the NW and still farther Westerly; and immediately sent forth its Rays after the same manner from all Parts, now here, now there, they observing no Rule or Order in their rising. Many of these Rays seeming to concur near the Zenith, formed there a Corona, or Image which drew the Attention of all Spectators...

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