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alternations of beautiful scenery, Ants and ostriches, buffaloes and adorned with all the magnificencé bats, monkeys and tigers, camelof tropical vegetation, and of ex- leopards and scorpions, puff-adders tensive deserts that threatened dis- and elephants, and snakes, and truction to every living thing ;--for springbucks, and hartbucks, and the sand hills, and ravines, and quachas, and élks, and Izebras, rocks, and thickets, and rivers, and and lions, and wolves, and jackals, précipices, which impeded their and knobs, and "hippopatamni, and course ;--for the repeated delay hyægas, are among the living creacaused by the straying of oxen, the țures which either served to minisufferings produced by a 'want of ster to'his, wants, or to alarm his water, and the joy caused to man fears, and which now contribute and beast by the opportunity of their innocuous interest to this slaking their thirst in the full and pages. I see 1571 7943 flowing river;---for the extraordi- In short, Mr Campbell's matenary variations of temperature, which rials are most abundant, and had gave them to experience, in the there been any skitt bestowed on space of a single day, the extre- their composition and arrangement, mities of an English year;--for the he must have beld a distinguished kindnesses received from gover- place amoug, modern travellers, nors, and secretaries, and land. But the very defective aid even drosts, and functionaries of all slovenly manner in which his work degrees, and boors, male and has been executed, we fear, will female, kindnesses highly honour- prevent its finding a general and able to all the parties ;—for the ready admission into literary.cir particulars of his intercourse with cles. > Vr 876940 poids The various tribes of natives who The part of Mr.Campbell's work fell in his way, the alarmis infused with which werourselves are least into bis party by reports of hostile satisfied, because we think it the Caftres aud plundering Boshesmen, least -adapted to conciliate the fa and the no less signal terrors which your of men of good taste and the exhibition of bis looking-glass sound judgment, is what may be or his watch inflicted on many a called his reflections. Forex poor Booshuana or Coranda spec ample, when from the quickness tator;- for the account of the toilets avith which the eye becomes familiar of the Matchappee ladies, of ca, with strange trees and towers, he verns bung with bats, and moun- deduces this inference, that do tains composed of incombustible thing but the upsearchablé dehovah, petticoats (p. 261.); for battles of as a man's portion, can fully gratifs scorpions, and battles with lions, his immorral midd," p. 35, or when and a thousand other things equally he discovers a motive to patience novel and amusing or instructive, in the thought that the progress of we must refer the curious reader hisaoxen though slow, was swift to the volume before us. Here when compared with that of a also he may contemplate plants of spail or cameleon ; slow and swift every size, from the lowly lowereti being only comparative terms, the of the vale, to the loftiest tenant of mail coach moving slowly gathea the mountain; not indeed scientido compared with a pigeon, ai pigeon fically ortiintelligibly classed, but when compared with planet, and still so described as to interest the a planet when compated all lover of nature. But what has light, p. 68 it is impossible not to most excited our astonishment, we, wish that the author had confined had almost said our envy, is the such reflections to bis own bosom. display of the varied form of ani-, They mask, indeed, the pious frame mal life with which this journeye of his mind, but are not likely to bas made Mr Campbell, familiar, produce any ivery useful imprese

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sion on the 'minds of others. Nor All soon possess this God-like feast, do we think that he has succeeded And praise the Lord from west to east.” better when he has attempted to :

p. 241. clothe his ideas in verse. We give B ut with all its defects, we conthe only specimen which the vo- sider this work as highly honourlume affords. asvlera v aroit hoto

able, both to Mr. Campbell and 4 The reflection that no European the Society by which he was emeye had ever surveyed these plains, and ployed. It is well entitled to the mountains, and rivers, and that I was attention of the Christian and the ten thousand miles from home, made a philanthropist, and even of the mere solemn impression on my mind, which philosopher; and it will serve, at was deepened by the stillness which at least, to shew to what persevering that time prevailed. I snatched a scrap effe

efforts, to what painful sacrifices, of paper from my pocket, on which I wrote the following lines: toda a

and self-denying labours, the love "I'm far from what I call my home, .

of God and compassion for souls

can, even in these degenerate days, In regions where no white men come; Where wilds and wilder men are found,

animate the devoted servant of Who never heard the Gospel sound. i Jesus Christ. This is a demonstra. Indeed they know not that there's Ouction to which Mr. Campbell has Ruling on high, and God alone. contributed a large body of proof, In dags and nights for five months past, and in so doing, he bolds a higher Ive traveli'd much; am here at last, place, in our estimation, than if, On banks of stream well named Great,

without this, he had rivalled, in his To drink its water is a treat.

style, the moral majesty of Johnson, But here to have the living word, Enriching treasure! Spirit's sword, il

the philosophical enlargement of A favour this that can't be told, si,

Burke, the fascinating elegance of In worth surpassing finest gold.

Buffon, or the classical taste of May Bushmen and the Booshuanas,

Clarke or Eustace. The Namaequaas and the Corannas,

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LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL INTELLIGENCE,

&c. &c. ...... ...," laus

-11,"7GREAT BRITAIN. !rocco, Cyprus, Egypt, Arabia, Syria, In the press :--A Dissertation on Regea and Turkey - Paris revisited in 1815, by neration and Baptism, in Answer to Dr. Mr.John Scott;-Justification by Faith Mant, by the Rev. T., Biddulph, of without Works, a Sermon, by the Rev. Bristol ;-A similar Dissertation, by the T. Young, Rector of Gilling, and late Rev. H. Gauntlett, of Olney ;-(Mr. Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge; Scott's Answer has been published); -- Mr. Sumner's Treatise on the Being and Parts XV. and XVI. of Mr.Storer's De Attributes of God, to which the Prescription of the Cathedrals of Great Bri. mium of 4001. was adjudged at Aberdeen taip;Jonah, the Seatonian Prize Poem, (see our Number for September last) in by the Rev. J.W. Bellamy, M. A., of 2 vols. 8vo.-and the Rev. Reginald Queen's College, Cambridge;-Repres Heber's Bampton Lectures. 7 sentative History of Great Bristain and Preparing for publication: A Life Ireland, by Mr. Oldfield Travels in of John Hampden, by Mr. Meadley ;Beloochistan and Rinde, by Lieut. Pot. A Meteorological Journal, in French, tinger, of the East India Company's. to be continued periodically, by Mr.T. Service; --The History and Antiquities Forster. of the Abbey Church at Bath, by Mr. On the Ist of January, 1816, will be Britton - The Speeches of the Right published, price 25. 60. the first Num. Hon. Edmund Burke, Observations of ber of a monthly periodical work, en a Russian, during a residence of ten titled, 16 The Asiatic Journal, and months in England, translated from the Monthly Register for British India and original MS. of Oloff Napea;-A transe. its Dependencies," embracing a variety lation of the Travels of Ali Bey in Mo. of objects interesting to the Man of

CHRIST. OBSERV. No. 16A

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RELIGIOUS INTE LLIGENCE.

· CINQUE PORTS AUXILIARY sources of that institution. But he saw BIBLE SOCIETY...

no reason whatever, why he should not On the 5th inst. the second anniver. at the same time afford to the British sary meeting of the Cinque Ports and Foreign Bible Society every assisAuxiliary Bible Society took place at tance in his power, and why he should Dover, the earl of Liverpool, the pre- not eyince an equal anxiety to promote sident of the society, in the chair. On its success. The object of the two taking the chair, the poble earl ad. Societies were one: both dispersed the verted to the elevated rank to which, pure and uncorrupted 'word of God. under the superintendance of Divine This being the case, he should always Providence, this nation had been raised consider it as an honour to aid these and in the estimation of Europe, and which all other societies which had the same rendered it of the highest importance object in view, and were labouring to efthat we should vindicate our right to fect the same benevolent end-the dissethis elevation, by shewing that Britain, mination of Christianity throughout the 'great as she confessedly was in arts and habitable globe. He was a friend to arms, was no less justly entitled by her the Bible Society, because it could ope high tone of moral feeling to the same rate in situations where, from local pre-eminence in this respect, which she circumstances, or the prevalence of had so happily attained in every other. different religious sentiments, the So. It became, under these circumstances ciety for promoting Christian Know. of gratifying distinction, our paramount ledge would not obtain admission. The duty to labour to extend the benign universality of the single and exclusive influence of Christianity, the knowledge object proposed by the British and of pure and undefiled religion, even to Foreign Bible Society, and its consethe utmost bounds of the earth. His quent tendency to unite all Christians lordship remarked, that the foundation (however divided on subjects of minor of this society had been laid at a period concern) in the bonds of Christiau-sympawhen we ourselves were suffering from thy and benevolence, gave it, in his lord. the pressure of national difficulty and ship's mind, a powerful claim to univerdistress, and when all around 118 the very sal support. He concluded a speech of bonds of civilised society were nearly great energy, liberality, and decision, burst asynder. Surely then it became by stating, that, in having accepted us, now that through the Divine blessing the office of president of this society, prosperity was smiling on us with her he had considered himself as only per. choicest favours, that we should not relax forming an act of duty; and if his inour exertions, but with increased ar- fluence should have the happy effect of donr pursue our beneficent course, firmly benefiting the Society, one great end resolved, whether in prosperity or ad- which he had in view in joining it was versity, to persevore in our efforts until fully answered; and as to the future, the whole world should be illumined "be pledged himself to continue the with the light of Divine Revelation steady and zealous friend and sup. "On receiving the thanks of the meet. portor of the British and Foreign Bible ing, his lordshịp entered more particn- Society as long as be lived. 1 Jarly into the nature and merits of the 9 On quitting the chair his lordship institution. As a member of the Esta presented the Society with a second blished Church, from education and donation of 501. habit, but much more from considera. 3This speech of lord Liverpool, the tion and conviction, he was particularly prime minister of the British empire, desirous 'of promoting its interests to the known and attached friend of the the utmost of his ability. Under this Church of England, is an answer to a impression he had recently appeared, thousand libels, issuing from what quat, 'on a public occasion, as a supporter ter they may, against the British and of the Society for promoting Christian Foreign Bible Society. No one, thereKnowledge; and he was doubtless anxi. fore, will donbt that we have real plea: ous to extend the influence and re. sure in laying it before our readers

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