The Humorous Chap-books of Scotland, Volumes 1-2

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H. L. Hinton, 1873 - Chapbooks
 

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Page 167 - O most gracious and merciful Lord God, wonderful in Thy Providence, I return all possible thanks to Thee for the care Thou hast always taken of me. I continually meet with most signal instances of this Thy Providence, and one act yesterday, when I unexpectedly met with three old...
Page 27 - I was pretty secure till I came to this place. I was stormstayed two days at Castle Drummond by the most tempestuous weather of wind and rain that I ever remember to see. The Dutches of Perth and Lady Mary Drummond...
Page 22 - The whole land raised and uneven, and full of stones: many of them very large, of a hard iron quality; and all the ridges crooked in shape of an S, and very high and full of noxious weeds and poor, being worn out by culture, without proper manure or tillage. The people poor, ignorant, and slothful, and ingrained enemies to planting, enclosing, or any improvement or cleanness.
Page 27 - Drummond was so kind as to go down to the Strath, and bring wrights, and carts, and smiths, to our assistance, who dragged us to the plain, where we were forced to stay five or six hours, till there was a new axletree made ; so that it was dark night before we came to Dunblaine, which is but eight miles from Castle Drummond ; and we were all much fatigued.
Page 255 - ... 3. How Simon lost a sack of corn as he was going to the mill to have it ground. 4. How Simon went to market with a basket of eggs, but broke them by the way : also how he was put into the stocks. 5. How Simon's wife cudgell'd him for not bringing home money for his eggs.
Page 21 - by the indulgence of a very worthy father," he was allowed, though then very young, to begin to inclose and plant and provide and prepare nurseries. " At that time, there was not one acre upon the whole...
Page 26 - ... girls were forced to go on bare horses behind footmen, and I was obliged to ride myself, though I was very tender and the day very cold. I came with that equipage to Ruthven late at night, and my chariot was pulled there by...
Page 207 - We meet with them on every stall, and in every cottage. They are essentially the Library of Entertaining Knowledge to our peasantry, and have maintained their ground in the affections of the people, notwithstanding the attempt of religious, political, or learned associations, to displace them, by substituting more elegant and wholesome literature in their stead.'* Dr.
Page 117 - Altho' we canna tell the cause, To drive poor Peter from the earth, An' cause sic mourning into Perth, Where lang the honest body dwelt, Where mony a hunder beuk he selt, An' where ten thousand wad defend him, And sae wad ilk ane done that kend him. Alas ! poor Pate ! nae mair will ye Tell tales again wi...
Page xiii - ... tales, has owed much. In truth, it is no exaggeration, when we state that he who desires to acquire a thorough knowledge of low Scottish life, vulgar manners, national characteristics, and popular jokes, must devote his days and nights to the study of John Cheap, the Chapman...

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