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pose a good one; to beget and embolden presumption, and to weaken faith ; to countenance dissembled love, and to damp and chill the love of God by the stirrings of corruption ; to make hypocrites rage and be confident, and to make the faint stagger at the promise; to set the Pharisee to thank God he is not as other men, and the faint to be unthankful for what he has, by complaining the Lord hath forsaken me, and my God hath forgotten me: this, this is the work of Satan; and as he is such a sworn enemy to God, it is not in his nature to act otherwise. Jealous suspicion is the complaint of the holy spouse; but there must be some love or liking where this jealousy operates: for why should I burn in the injured lover's fire, if I am not rivalled in the object loved. It was the loss of the heavenly lover's embraces, and the joy of the daughters of Jerusalem, that threw the spouse into her fits of love-sickness; she could not bear to see the daughters rival her, who had been so long in a state of wedlock. But this disorder makes us search and seek the more after him; now will I seek bim whom my soul loveth : and it makes us prize him the more when we find him; I found bim whom my soul loveth, I held bim faft and would nat let him go: and it makes us more careful not to offend him; I charge you, O'ye daughters of Jerufalem, not to fir, nor awake my love till be please.

The text Zech. xii. 10, is spoken chiefly of the Jews, at their future reconversion, which is yet to

come; come; and although a godly sorrow must be found in all that are saved, Hezekiah and Job went on long without it, and both were in the faith of Christ, and both came to this when the furnace of affliction had tried them and purged them. God hath given you an honest and a good heart; you look well to your way, and ponder the path of your feet, and I hope that you will keep on, so that all your thoughts may be established; you neither Thun the light nor Aee from it, and this is doing the truth. The objections and excuses you make against opening your mouth for God, have no weight with me, nor have they any with your conscience; you are not going to take the charge of an established people, who require every mystery of the kingdom to be held forth in the strongest point of light. The strong faith, Haming love, and assurance, that you talk of, was not found in one of the twelve apostles when first sent out by Christ; nor in the heart of one of the twice seventy which the Lord sent out before ; nor yer in Paul, who, feeling the terrors of the Lord, warned finners day and night, for three years, with tears. Paul was to be a minister of what he had feen, and of other things for the which I will appear unto thee; we are to minister as of the ability which God giveth; an alarmed foul can sound an aların; one in terrors can persuade men; a doubtful soul can synipathize with the doubtful, the weak with the weak, the tempted with the tempted, the deserted with the deserted; Paul was obliged to be

come

come all things to all men; and others, in such cases, edified each other, and bore each other's burdens. These fix persons are a prelude to your future success; you know it, and your conscience lashes you for your frivolous excuses. As for the gale from the heavenly hills, it appears to me to be a divine motion to induce you to comply with my injunction; you must prophesy, and then the wind will blow on the Nain. How are the daughters of Zion to rejoice unless their salvation cometh ? and how are they to believe or hear without a preacher? and how shall she labour to bring forth, if no preacher to travail in birth until Christ be formed in her children? However, I must leave this with God and your conscience, and should not wonder if some fore confict befall thee, if thou altogether hold thy peace at such a time as this. As to my coming to G , I never will, until your hand is on the plough, and then perhaps I may. My kind love to all friends. Excuse haste; while I remain,

Yours to serve in Christ Jesus,

W. H. S.S.

LETTER

LETTER XV.

To the Rev. Mr. HUNTINGTON.

MY DEAR SIR,

I must write a few lines to you to day, though I think I have but very little to tell you. I am not able to form any judgment of myself; nor do I know where I am, or what I am; a perishing finner I certainly am, but whether my hope is true or false I do not know. I experience. various changes : sometimes I am much oppressed with heaviness and darkness; feel a burden on my spirits ready to sink me; the plague of my heart, the confusion of my mind, the importance of the work, my incapacity for it, and above all the doubtful state of my soul, make me ready to wish that I never was born. Under this weight I can hardly at times stand, and have often resolved to give up all; but again I am a little eased, and after this will follow two or three days respite; then I am at it again, and somehow find more strength than ever ; this so encourages me, that I am ready to conclude that the worst is over, that the Lord gently leads me,

and

and will by degrees bring me into his presence; but when my distress again returns, then I conclude that the bitterness of death is not yet passed, that I must go deeper than ever ; the which, like a coward, I greatly dread, and yet want to know the worst. Sometimes, especially of late, I have found my old crimes (in which I long indulged myself, and that against the rebukes of conscience) stirred up, and am haunted and harassed by them for days together, and greatly fear I shall one day fall. These things are bitter plagues to me; I have cried to the Lord against them, and, in answer to these poor petitions, he has abated their force, and has taken them away for weeks together; buc now and then they will be shewing themselves again, as if they would let me know that they are not dead; but I cry again, and am helped : and I think the Lord's promise to Paul has, in some measure, been verified in me, viz. His strength made perfect in my weakness; and at times I have been able to defy the devil, and tell him to his face that his labour is vain, that I fall not fall; and the words of the Saviour to Peter have been often sweet to me, I have prayed for thee, that iby faith fail not. If you recollect, I hinted ac some of them to you the last time I was at your house, and you touched upon them in prayer before we parted, and, God knows, I have not found the strength of them so much since; whereas, on

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