The Poems of Sir Robert Aytoun

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A. & C. Black, 1844 - 154 pages
 

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Page 46 - When new desires had conquered thee. And changed the object of thy will, It had been lethargy in me, Not constancy, to love thee still. Yea, it had been a sin to go And prostitute affection so; Since we are taught no prayers to say To such as must to others pray. Yet do thou glory in thy choice, Thy choice of his good fortune boast; I'll neither grieve nor yet rejoice To see him gain what I have lost. The height of my disdain shall be To laugh at him, to blush for thee; To love thee still, but go...
Page 68 - I DO confess thou'rt smooth and fair, And I might have gone near to love thee, Had I not found the slightest prayer That lips could speak, had power to move thee ; But I can let thee now alone As worthy to be loved by none.
Page 69 - Her sweets no longer with her dwells: But scent and beauty both are gone, And leaves fall from her, one by one. Such fate ere long will thee betide When thou hast handled been awhile, With sere flowers to be thrown aside; And I shall sigh, while some will smile, To see thy love to every one Hath brought thee to be loved by none.
Page 45 - I LOVED thee once; I'll love no more, — Thine be the grief as is the blame; Thou art not what thou wast before, What reason I should be the same? He that can love unloved again, Hath better store of love than brain: God send me love my debts to pay, While unthrifts fool their love away!
Page 69 - Should auld acquaintance be forgot, And never thought upon ? The flames of love extinguished, And freely past and gone ? Is thy kind heart now grown sae cauld, In that loving breast o...
Page 46 - He that can love unloved again, Hath better store of love than brain: God send me love my debts to pay, While unthrifts fool their love away. Nothing could have my love o'erthrown, If thou hadst still continued mine ; Yea, if thou hadst remained thy own, I might perchance have yet been thine.
Page 70 - Is't worldly cares so desperate That makes thee to despair ? Is't that makes thee exasperate, And makes thee to forbear ? If thou of that were free as I, Thou surely should be mine ; If this were true, we should renew Kind old long syne.
Page 38 - If all that say they die, had died indeed, Sure long e're now the world had had an end. Besides, we need not love but if we please ; No destiny can force men's disposition; And how can any die of that disease, Whereof himself may be his own physician?
Page 55 - As makes me think ere long I cannot choose But be some grandee, whatsoe'er I'm now. But having spent my pipe, I then perceive That hopes and dreams are cousins — both deceive. Then...
Page 39 - Are both extremes, and all extremes are vice, Yet have I been a lover by report. Yea, I have died for love as others do, But, praised be God, it was in such a sort, That I revived within an hour or two.

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