The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, Volumes 5-6

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Contents

Torture
59
Hamilton Crawford
65
The new Bishops
67
Suite of the Highlands
76
Peculiar Nature of Jacobitism in the Highlands
85
The Stewarts and Macnaghtens
91
Feud between the Macdonalds and Mackintoshes Inverness
97
Insurrection of the Clans hostile to the Campbells
104
Quarrels in the Highland Army
115
Edinburgh Castle surrenders
128
Opening of the Parliament
141
Debates on the East India Trade
149
Disorders in the Highland Army
151
intrigues of the Club State of the Lowlands
157
Case of Samuel Johnson
163
Bill of Rights
175
Last Days of Jeffreys
181
Intemperance of Howe
188
Preparations for a Campaign in Ireland
194
Dismission of Melfort
204
Conspiracy among the French Troops in the English Service
211
Maritime Affairs
218
Imputations thrown on Marlborough
224
Pope Innocent XI succeeded by Alexander VIII
225
Arguments against taking the Oaths
232
A great Majority of the Clergy take the Oaths
238
Sherlock
244
Kettlewell Fitzwilliam
252
An Ecclesiastical Commission issued
259
Proceedings of the Commission
266
Constitution of the Convocation
274
The Convocation meets
280
CHAPTER XV
288
Enquiry into the Conduct of the Irish War
294
Violence of the Whigs
302
The Corporation Bill
310
Debates on the Indemnity Bill
317
The King purposes to retire to Holland
323
Dissolution and General Election
330
Sir John Lowther
336
Sir John Trevor
345
Hopes of the Jacobites
353
Bill declaring the Acts of the preceding Parliament valid
367
Act of Grace 876
376
An auxiliary Force sent from France to Ireland 884
388
Peun
389
The Jacobites betrayed by Fuller 892
400
Danger of Invasion and Insurrection Tourvilles Fleet
407
Alarm in London
414
William lands at Carrickfergus and proceeds to Belfast
420
Tyrconnel and Lauzun go to France William returns
488
Affairs in Scotland Intrigues of Montgomery with the Jac
494
Melville Lord High Commissioner the Government obtains
500
William dissatisfied with the Ecclesiastical Arrangements
503
The Coalition between the Club and the Jacobites dissolved
509
General Acquiescence in the new Ecclesiastical Polity
515
State of Affairs on the Continent the Duke of Savoy joins
525
Proceedings against Torrington 581
533
Meeting of the leading Conspirators
541
CONTENTS OF THE SIXTH VOLUME
11
Congress at the Hague 17
17
William obtains a Toleration for the Waldenses 23
23
Trials of Preston and Ashton 28
29
Turner 85
35
Interview between Penn and Sidney 43
43
Russell 69
69
William returns to the Continent 79
79
State of the Part of Ireland which was subject to James 88
88
Return of Tyreonnel to Ireland 94
94
Retreat of the Irish Army 106
106
FallofGalway 114
114
Ascendency of the Club 121
121
Troubles in Athol 127
127
The Irish Troops required to make their Election between
128
State of Ireland after the War 134
134
Death of Dundee 110
141
The Highland Army reinforced 117
150
Debates on the Bill for regulating Trials in Cases of High
174
Plot formed by Marlborough against the Government
184
Marlboroughs Plot disclosed by the Jacobites 190
190
Fullers Plot 198
198
Bill for ascertaining the Salaries
208
Ministerial Changes in Scotland 214
214
Glencoe 220
220
William goes to the Continent Death of Louvois 249
249
A Daughter born to James 25 7
258
Effect produced by Jamess Declaration
267
James flies to France Dublin evacuated by the French
273
Battle of La Hogue 270
275
Foreign Policy of William 298
298
Lewis takes the Field 305
305
Lewis returns to Versailles 312
312
Battle of Steinkirk 316
325
Youngs Plot 279
327
Increase of Crime 335
335
Case of Lord Mohun 351
351
Orijrin of the National Debt 362
366
Parliamentary Reform 376
376
The Place Bill 883
390
Scotland 424
424

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Page 66 - When the poor and needy seek water, and there is none, and their tongue faileth for thirst, I the Lord will hear them, I the God of Israel will not forsake them. I will open rivers in high places, and fountains in the midst of the valleys : I will make the wilderness a pool of water, and the dry land springs of water.
Page 152 - Elizabeth under the name of the Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading to the East Indies.
Page 221 - Mile after mile the traveller looks in vain for the smoke of one hut, or for one human form wrapped in a plaid, and listens in vain for the bark of a shepherd's dog or the bleat of a lamb. Mile after mile the only sound that indicates life, is the faint cry of a bird of prey from some storm-beaten pinnacle of rock. The progress of civilisation, which has turned so many wastes into fields yellow with harvests or gay with apple-blossoms, has only made Glencoe more desolate.
Page 364 - ... of the higher. There was a Copper Company which proposed to explore the mines of England, and held out a hope that they would prove not less valuable than those of Potosi. There was a Diving Company which undertook to bring up precious effects from shipwrecked vessels, and which announced that it had laid in a stock of wonderful machines resembling complete suits of armour.
Page 425 - King answered that he had not come to Ireland to let the grass grow under his feet. The event seems to prove that he judged rightly as a general. That he judged rightly ns a statesman cannot be doubted.
Page 242 - Meanwhile Lindsay had knocked at the door of the old Chief and had asked for admission in friendly language. The door was opened. Mac Ian, while putting on his clothes and calling to his servants to bring some refreshment for his visitors, was shot through the head. Two of his attendants were slain with him. His wife was already up and dressed in such finery as the princesses of the rude Highland glens were accustomed to wear. The assassins pulled off her clothes and trinkets.
Page 524 - that your management shall be such that we may have no reason to repent of what we have done. We never could be of the mind that violence was suited to the advancing of true religion ; nor do we intend that our authority shall ever be a tool to the irregular passions of any party. Moderation is what religion enjoins, what neighbouring Churches expect from you, and what we recommend to you.
Page 229 - ... men do for their party, for their sect, for their country, for their favourite schemes of political and social reform, what they would not do to enrich or to avenge themselves. At a temptation directly addressed to our private cupidity or to our private animosity, whatever virtue we have takes the alarm. But virtue itself may contribute to the fall of him who imagines that it is in his power, by violating some general rule of morality, to confer an important benefit on a church, on a commonwealth,...
Page 365 - ... trigonometry, heraldry, japanning, fortification, bookkeeping, and the art of playing the theorbo. Some of these companies took large mansions and printed their advertisements in gilded letters. Others, less ostentatious, were content with ink, and met at coffeehouses in the neighbourhood of the Royal Exchange. Jonathan's and Garraway's were in a constant ferment with brokers, buyers, sellers, meetings of directors, meetings of proprietors.
Page 243 - ... weariness, and want were not less numerous than those who were slain by the assassins. When the troops had retired, the Macdonalds crept out of the caverns of Glencoe, ventured back to the spot where the huts had formerly stood, collected the scorched corpses from among the smoking ruins, and performed some rude rites of sepulture. The tradition runs that the hereditary bard of the tribe took his seat on a rock which overhung the place of slaughter, and poured forth a long lament over his murdered...

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