The Mysteries of Paris, Volume 3

Front Cover
Chapman and Hall, 1846 - Paris (France) - 1430 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 120 - ... justly remunerated, in a way that shall assure to him not the superfluities, but the necessaries of life — the means of continuing healthy and strong, active and industrious — and consequently, honest and good, because his condition is rendered happy. The gloomy regions of misery and ignorance are peopled with morbid beings with withered hearts. Purify these moral sewers, spread instruction, the inducement to...
Page 119 - ... courts very much resemble those of a barrack or manufactory kept with exceeding care. There are lofty facades of white stone pierced with high and large windows, which admit of the free circulation of pure air. The stones and pavement of the enclosures are kept excessively clean. On the ground floor, the large apartments, warmed during the winter, are kept well ventilated during the summer, and are used during the day as places of conversation, work, or for the meals of the prisoners. The upper...
Page 305 - But every thing has an end, and when my strength failed me, bread failed me also. They turned me out of my lodging ; and I do not know what would have become of me, if a poor woman had not taken me into a cellar, where she was hiding from her husband, who had sworn he would kill her. There I was brought...
Page 119 - How many workmen are there who can save such a sum 't lis choice — a society, we repeat, which measures his consideration by the magnitude of his crimes? A hardened convict knows neither misery, hunger, nor cold. What is to him the horror he inspires honest persons withal ? He does not see, does not know them. His crimes made his glory, his influence, his strength, with the ruffians in the midst of whom he will henceforward pass his life. Why should he fear shame? Instead of the serious and charitable...
Page 120 - PARIS. fresh crimes. What can be more logical ? If discovered, and at once apprehended, he will find the repose, the bodily supplies of a prison, and his joyous and daring associates of crime and debauchery. If his experience in crimes be less than that of others, does he for that evince the less remorse ? it follows that he is exposed to brutal scoffing, infernal taunts, and horrible threats. And — a thing so rare that it has become the exception to the rule — if the prisoner leaves this fearful...
Page 120 - ... into the depths of that abyss whence he had escaped with such difficulty. In the following scenes we shall endeavour to demonstrate the monstrous and inevitable consequences of confinement in masses. After ages of barbarous experiments and pernicious hesitations, it seemed suddenly understood how irrational it is to plunge into an atmosphere of deepest vice persons whom a pure and salubrious air could alone save. How many centuries to discover that in placing in dense contact diseased beings,...
Page 40 - I have before my eyes, there are other tortures — there are overwhelming comparisons. I say to myself, if I had remained an honest man, at this moment I should be free, tranquil, happy, loved, and honored by mine own, instead of being blind and chained in this dungeon, at the mercy of my accomplices.

Bibliographic information