Just what War is: The Civil War Writings of De Forest and Bierce

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Univ. of Tennessee Press, 1997 - Literary Criticism - 172 pages
Over the course of a career that stretched from the early 1920s through the late 1970s, David E. Lilienthal became a larger-than-life symbol of American liberalism. A founding director of the Tennessee Valley Authority who later served as the first chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, he shared in the great triumphs of the New Deal and Fair Deal eras, as well as in the disappointments that came with the West's attempts to spread its values abroad. This book, the first full biography of Lilienthal, explores the public and private dimensions of the man and, in so doing, illuminates the promise and limitations of the American liberal dream in the twentieth century. As a public figure, Lilienthal was controversial: outspoken, articulate, charismatic, and sometimes ruthless in pursuit of his goals. Yet, in his work with the TVA and the AEC, he displayed a strong commitment to administrative responsibility and openness in governmental policy making and was instrumental in promoting a sense of public service and purpose in both agencies. After 1950, Lilienthal became an active internationalist, striving to create models for development in Third World venues as widely separated as Central Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Through his visionary Development and Resources Corporation, he established extensive ties with leaders of every stripe, including the Shah of Iran, various Latin American presidents, and, in his own country, Lyndon B. Johnson. The Lilienthal story is one of paradoxes and contradictions in human nature, of an enormous ego yoked with good intentions and a humane spirit. As this book demonstrates in compelling detail, the liberal dream that Lilienthal embodiedworked at home but not abroad. In contrast to his victories on the domestic front, Lilienthal's efforts in overseas arenas often failed tragically - born as they were of an inability to understand that the political, economic, and social realities of an Iran or a Vietnam were far diff
 

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Contents

The Components of Realism
1
The Limits of Experience
23
The Uses of Influence
42
The Failures of History
65
To March toward the Sound of the Guns
103
I Would Not Have Missed This for
131
Notes
141
Works Cited
159
Index
167
Copyright

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