Property is Theft!: A Pierre-Joseph Proudhon Anthology

Front Cover

"An indispensable source book for anyone interested in Proudhon's ideas and the origins of the socialist and anarchist movements in nineteenth-century Europe."—Robert Graham, editor of Anarchism: A Documentary History of Libertarian Ideas

"Iain McKay's introduction offers a sure-footed guide through the misconceptions surrounding Proudhon's thought."—Mark Leier, author of Bakunin: The Creative Passion

More influential than Karl Marx during his lifetime, Pierre-Joseph Proudon's work has long been out of print or unavailable in English. Iain McKay's comprehensive collection is a much-needed and timely historical corrective.

Iain McKay is the editor of An Anarchist FAQ.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
A Biographical Sketch
53
Further Notes
61
What Is Property?
87
Letter to M Blanqui on Property
139
Letter to Antoine Gauthier
159
System of Economic Contradictions Volume 1
167
System of Economic Contradictions Volume 2
229
Toast to the Revolution
359
The Constitution and the Presidency
367
Bank of the People
383
Confessions of a Revolutionary
395
Letter to Pierre Leroux
495
Interest and Principal
509
General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century
543
Letter to Villiaumé
601

Solution of the Social Problem
257
Organisation of Credit and Circulation
281
Letter to Louis Blanc
295
The Situation
303
The Mystification of Universal Suffrage
315
Opening Session of the National Assembly
323
Foreign Affairs
329
To the EditorinChief of Le Représentant du Peuple
335
Address to the Constituent National Assembly
345
The Malthusians
353
Stock Exchange Speculators Manual
609
Justice in the Revolution and in the Church
619
Letter to Milliet
685
Letter to M X
721
The Theory of Property
775
The Paris Commune
785
Glossary
793
Index
809
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon (1809-1869) was one of the most important and influential political theorists of the 19th century. The first person to call himself an anarchist, he is the author of What is Property? An Inquiry into the Principle of Right and of Government; The System of Economical Contradictions (or, the Philosophy of Misery); and The General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century.

Bibliographic information