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Books Books 1 - 10 of 153 on To this war of every man against every man this also is consequent, that nothing....
" To this war of every man against every man this also is consequent, that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. "
The Quarterly Review - Page 435
edited by - 1887
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The Works of Dugald Stewart: The philosophy of the active and moral powers ...

Dugald Stewart - Philosophy - 1829
...interpreters of their laws.' " In the state of nature (according to him) nothing can be unjust, and the notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice have there no place. Where there is no common power there is no law ; where no law no transgression. No law can be unjust.f...
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The English Works of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, Volume 3

Thomas Hobbes, Thucydides, Homer - Philosophy - 1839 - 11 pages
...such a ^, . . , ,r- . " . war nothing this also is consequent ; that nothing can be unjust. ;s Unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law : where no law, no injustice. Force, and fraud, are...
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The English Works of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, Volume 3

Thomas Hobbes, Thucydides, Homer - Philosophy - 1839 - 11 pages
...of every man, against every man, Tn such a this also is consequent ; that nothing can be unjust, u The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law : where no law, no injustice. Force, and fraud, are...
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The London university magazine

...tempers, customs and doctrines of men are different." Again in a state of nature nothing is unjust — " the notions of right and wrong, "justice and injustice, have there no place. Where there is no comnion " power, there is no law ; where no law no injustice." What a false and degrading...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 13

American literature - 1848
...To this warre of every man against every man this also is consequent — that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. Force and raud are in warre the two cardinall vertues," &c. — Ibid. In this exigency one would look...
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The True Intellectual System of the Universe: Wherein All the ..., Volume 3

Ralph Cudworth - Atheism - 1845
...And he gives us the same over again in English : " In the state of. nature nothing can be unjust ; the notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice have there no place ; where there is no common power, there is no law ; where no law, no transgression."J " No law can...
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The True Intellectual System of the Universe: Wherein All the ..., Volume 3

Ralph Cudworth - Atheism - 1845
...it." And he gives us the same over again in English : " In the state of nature nothing can be unjust ; the notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice have there no place; where there is no common power, there is no law ; where no law, no transgression. "^ " Xo law can be...
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The Christian remembrancer; or, The Churchman's Biblical, ecclesiastical ...

1846
...war. 'To this war of every man against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law; where no law. no injustice. Force and fraud are in...
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The Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 13

John Holmes Agnew, Walter Hilliard Bidwell - 1848
...To this warre of every man against every man this also is consequent — that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. Force and fraud are in warre the two cardinall venues," fice. —Rid. In this exigency one would look...
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The Philosophy of the Active and Moral Powers of Man

Dugald Stewart - Ethics - 1849 - 428 pages
...interpreters of their laws.' f ' In the state of nature,' according to him, ' nothing can be unjust, and the notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. * It may be proper to mention that Cudworth alludes here to Gassendi, who was at much pains to revive...
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