The expedition of Humphry Clinker

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David Ramsay. For Jo. and Ja. Fairbairn, ... and A. Guthrie, 1790
 

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Page 134 - ... they insist upon having the complexion of their pot-herbs mended, even at the hazard of their lives. Perhaps, you will hardly believe they can be so mad as to boil their greens with brass half-pence, in order to improve their colour ; and yet nothing is more true.
Page 35 - ... dangerous, and indirect. Its communication with the baths is through the yard of an inn, where the poor trembling valetudinarian is carried in a chair, betwixt the heels of a double row of horses, wincing under the curry-combs of grooms and postillions, over and above the hazard of being obstructed, or overturned, by the carriages which are continually making their exit or their entrance.
Page 38 - Knowing no other criterion of greatness, but the ostentation of wealth, they discharge their affluence without taste or conduct, through every channel of the most absurd extravagance; and all of them hurry to Bath, because here, without any further qualification, they can mingle with the princes and nobles of the land.
Page 387 - We should sometimes increase the motion of the machine, to unclog the wheels of life; and now and then take a plunge amidst the waves of excess, in order to case-harden the constitution.
Page 139 - ... like fifty ferpents. AT firft, I really thought he Was mad, and, as he fat near me, began to be under fome apprehenfions for my own fafety, when our landlord, perceiving me alarmed, aflured me aloud, that I had nothing to fear — " The gentleman (faid he) is trying to act a part for which he is by no means qualified — if he had all the inclination in the world, it is not in his power to be mad. His f'pirits are too flat to be kindled into frenzy.
Page 96 - It must be allowed, indeed, for the credit of the present age, that London and Westminster are much better paved and lighted than they were formerly. The new streets are spacious, regular, and airy ; and the houses generally convenient.
Page 142 - Tim had made shift to live many years by writing novels, at the rate of five pounds a volume; but that branch of business is now engrossed by female authors, who publish merely for the propagation of virtue, with so much ease and spirit, and delicacy, and knowledge of the human heart, and all in the serene tranquillity of high life, that the reader is not only enchanted by their genius, but reformed by their...
Page 138 - I was civilly received in a plain, yet decent habitation, which opened backwards into a very pleasant garden, kept in excellent order ; and, indeed, I saw none of the outward signs of authorship either in the house or the landlord, who is one of those few writers of the age that stand upon their own foundation, without patronage, and above dependence.
Page 142 - ... is now engrossed by female authors, who publish merely for the propagation of virtue, with so much ease, and spirit, and delicacy, and knowledge of the human heart, and all in the serene tranquillity of high life, that the reader is not only enchanted by their genius, but reformed by their morality.
Page 281 - On this side they display a sweet variety of woodland, corn-field, and pasture, with several agreeable villas emerging as it were out of the lake, till, at some distance, the prospect terminates in huge mountains covered with heath, which being in the bloom, affords a very rich covering of purple. Every thing here is romantic beyond imagination. This country is justly styled the Arcadia of Scotland; and I don't doubt but it may vie with Arcadia in every thing but climate. — I am sure it excels...

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