Kropotkin: And the Rise of Revolutionary Anarchism, 1872-1886

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 18, 2002 - History - 388 pages
This major study of Peter Kropotkin sets him firmly in the context of the development of the European anarchist movement as the man who became, after Bakunin's death, their chief exponent of anarchist ideas. It traces the origins and development of his ideas and revolutionary practice from 1872 to 1886, and assesses the subsequent influence of his life and work upon European radical and socialist movements. Dr Cahm analyses Kropotkin's role in the transformation of Bakunin's anti-authoritarian socialism, and shows how two principal types of revolutionary action emerge from anarchist efforts to develop clear alternatives to the parliamentary strategies of social democrats; one based on the activity of individuals and small groups, the other related to large-scale collective action.
 

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Contents

Bakuninism
17
statistantistatist polarisation
28
Anarchist communism
36
Kropotkin and anarchist communism 18771886
44
Kropotkin and the development of anarchist ideas of revolutionary action by individuals and small groups 18721886
69
Revolutionary action and the emergent anarchist movement of the seventies
71
Propaganda by deed the development of the idea
76
Kropotkin and propaganda by deed
92
Kropotkin and the development of anarchist views of collective revolutionary action
211
Trade unionism and the emergent anarchist movement of the 1870s
213
Kropotkin and collective action in the labour movement
231
The Pittsburg strikes in the United States and the revival of the Labour Movement in England and France
242
The Strikers International
251
Conclusion
270
Notes
287
Bibliography
350

Kropotkin and acts of revolt
116
The Congress of London 1881 and The Spirit of Revolt
152
The trial of Lyon 1883 and response to persecution
178

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