A Treatise of the Pleas of the Crown, Volume 1

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2004 - History - 1126 pages
Originally published: New York: New York University Press, 1956. x, 438 pp. The work consists of the papers delivered by participants in the conference sponsored by the New York University Institute of Comparative Law to honor the 150th anniversary of the French Civil Code, which was the largest public celebration of the event in the legal world. The papers deal with the influence of the Code upon common-law countries in their efforts to manage statute and case law and gives examples of modern attempts at restatement of the law and uniform state laws as examples of the effect of the Code's coherence and logic. The papers were given by notable legal scholars such as Benjamin Akzin, RenÚ Cassin, C.J. Friedrich, Arthur von Mehren, Roscoe Pound, Thibadeau Rinfret, Max Rheinstein, Angelo Piero Sereni, Jack Bernard Tate and Arthur T. Vanderbilt. At the time of these lectures Schwartz was Director of the Institute. Includes a bibliography by Julius J. Marke. Reprint of the first edition.

BERNARD SCHWARTZ [1923-1997] was professor of law and director of the Institute of Comparative Law, New York University. He was the author of over fifty books, including French Administrative Law and the Common-Law World (1954, reprinted 2006), the five-volume Commentary on the Constitution of the United States (1963-1968), Constitutional Law: A d104book (2d ed., 1979), Administrative Law: A Casebook (4th ed., 1994) and A History of the Supreme Court (1993).

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Contents

I
v
II
1
III
37
IV
139
V
141
VI
198
VII
376
VIII
392
XIII
463
XIV
473
XV
484
XVI
524
XVII
792
XVIII
813
XIX
840
XX
1004

IX
404
X
428
XI
433
XII
450
XXI
1012
XXII
1036
XXIII
1104
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Page 56 - ... compass, imagine, invent, devise, or intend death or destruction, or any bodily harm tending to death or destruction...
Page 524 - In a late work of great learning and research, larceny is defined at large to be " the " wrongful or fraudulent taking and carrying away by any person " of the mere personal goods of another, from any place, with a " felonious intent to convert them to his (the taker's) own use, " and make them his own property, without the consent of the
Page 167 - Whosoever shall falsely make or counterfeit any Coin resembling or apparently intended to resemble or pass for any of the Queen's current Copper Coin ; and whosoever, without lawful Authority or Excuse (the Proof whereof shall lie on the Party accused), shall knowingly make or mend, or begin or proceed to make or mend, or buy or sell, or have in his Custody or Possession...
Page 93 - ... stand upon the pillory the space of one whole hour, in some market town next adjoining to the place where the offence was committed, in open market there, or in the market town itself where the offence was committed.
Page 267 - After dinner he went to church ; and in the evening, returned home with his wife and neighbours, bringing his gun with him, which was carried into the room where his wife was, she having brought it part of the way. He, taking it up, touched the trigger ; and the gun went off and killed his wife, whom he dearly loved.
Page 265 - But if the ox were wont to push with his horn in time past, and it hath been testified to his owner, and he hath not kept him in, but that he hath killed a man or a woman ; the ox shall be stoned, and his owner also shall be put to death.
Page 445 - It is true that rape is a most detestable crime, and therefore ought severely and impartially to be punished with death; but it must be remembered that it is an accusation easily to be made and hard to be proved and harder to be defended by the party accused, though never so innocent.
Page 608 - Grounds inclosed with any Wall, Pale or other Fence, wherein any Deer have been or shall be usually kept, or in any Warren or Place where Hares or Conies have been or shall be usually kept, or in any High Road, Open Heath, Common or Down; or...
Page 90 - ... that the kings of this realm with the authority of parliament are not able to make laws to bind the crown and the descent thereof...
Page 472 - Entry shall be signed by the Minister with his proper Addition, and also by the Parties married, and attested by such Two Witnesses...

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