An Appendix to the Rowfant Library: A Catalogue of the Printed Books, Manuscripts, Autograph Letters Etc. Collected Since the Printing of the First Catalogue in 1886

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Page 19 - Fortunati ambo ! si quid mea carmina possunt, Nulla dies unquam memori vos eximet aevo : Dum domus .żEneae Capitoli immobile saxum Accolet, imperiumque pater Romanus habebit.
Page 21 - A Most pleasaunt and excellent conceited Comedie, of Syr lohn Falstaffe, and the merrie Wiues of Windsor. Entermixed with sundrie variable and pleasing humors, of Syr Hugh, the Welch Knight, Justice Shallow, and his wise Cousin, M. Slender. With the swaggering vaine of Auncient Pistoll, and Corporall Nym.
Page 13 - The Temple of Sacred Poems, sent to a gentlewoman. KNOW you, fair, on what you look ? Divinest love lies in this book ; Expecting fire from your eyes, To kindle this his sacrifice. When your hands untie these strings, Think you've an angel by the wings...
Page 46 - successors of Charles the Fifth may disdain their ' brethren of England, but the romance of Tom Jones, ' that exquisite picture of human manners, will outlive ' the Palace of the Escurial and the imperial eagle of 'the House of Austria.
Page 19 - Where Angels tremble while they gaze, He saw ; but blasted with excess of light. Closed his eyes in endless night. Behold, where Dryden's less presumptuous car, Wide o'er the fields of glory bear Two coursers of ethereal race, With necks in thunder clothed, and long-resounding pace.
Page 61 - We have reformed from them, not against them; for omitting those improperations and terms of scurrility betwixt us, which only difference our affections, and not our cause, there is between us one common name and appellation, one faith and necessary body of principles common to us both. And therefore I am not scrupulous to converse and live with them, to enter their churches in defect of ours, and either pray with them, or for them.
Page 13 - No, my dear lady. I could weary stars, And force the wakeful moon to lose her eyes, By my late watching, but to wait on you. When at your prayers you kneel before the altar, Methinks I'm singing with some choir in heaven, So blest I hold me in your company.
Page 13 - Hall in the beginning of the year 1634, and in that of his age sixteen, being then accounted the most amiable and beautiful person that ever eye beheld ; a person also of innate modesty, virtue, and courtly deportment, which made him then, but especially after, when he retired to the great city, much admired and adored by the female sex.
Page 83 - Great place and business in the world is not worth the looking after ; I should have no comfort in mine but that my hope is in the Lord's presence.
Page 69 - I take with pleasure this opportunity of doing justice to that great man, whose faults I knew, whose virtues I admired ; and whose memory, as the greatest general and as the greatest minister that our country or perhaps any other has produced, I honour.

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