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But wait a wee, o' love is slee, an winna be said nay,
It breaks a' chains except its ain, but it maun hae

its way;

Auld age was blind, the priest was kind, now happy as

can be, O poverty! () poverty! we're wed in spite o' thee!

WELCOME BAT AND OWLET GRAY.

JOANNA BAILLIE.

O welcome bat and owlet gray,
Thus winging lone your airy way ;
And welcome moth and drowsy fly,
That to mine ear come humming by ;
And welcome shadows long and deep,
And stars that from the pale sky peep!
O welcome all! to me ye say,
My woodland love is on her way.

Upon the soft wind floats her hair,
Her breath is in the dewy air,
Her steps are in the whisper'd sound
That steals along the stilly ground.
O dawn of day, in rosy bower,
What art thou in this witching hour!
O noon of day, in sunshine bright,
What art thou to the fall of night !

GOOD NIGHT, GOOD NIGHT!

JOANNA BAILLIE.

The sun is sunk, the day is done,
E’en stars are setting, one by one;
Nor torch nor taper longer may
Eke out the pleasures of the day;
And, since, in social glee's despite,
It needs must be, Good night, good night!

The bride into her bower is sent,
The ribald rhyme and jesting spent ;
The lover's whispered words, and few,
Have bid the bashful maid adieu ;
The dancing-floor is silent quite,
No foot bounds there, Good night, good night !

The lady in her curtained bed,
The herdsman in his wattled shed,
The clansman in the heathered hall,
Sweet sleep be with you, one and all !
We part in hope of days as bright
As this now gone-Good night, good night !

Sweet sleep be with us, one and all ;
And if upon its stillness fall
The visions of a busy brain,
We'll have our pleasures o'er again,
To warm the heart, and charm the sight:
Gay dreams to all! Good night, good night!

APPENDIX.

APPENDIX.

ADDITIONAL NOTES AND SONGS

TO VOLUME I.

THE CHARACTER OF A HAPPY LIFE.

p. 29.

Ben Jonson, we are told by Drummond, had these verses by heart. [“ Sir Edward Wotton's verses of a Happie Lyfe, he hath by heart.”] Conversations with Ben Jonson, 1619. Arch. Scot. iv. 89.

TO CELIA.

p. 31.

The most common-place of his (Jonson's] repetition was his verses of drinking, Drink to me bot with thyne Eyes.DRUMMOND OF HAWTHORNDEN. Arch. Scot. IV. 82.

WOMEN ARE BUT MEN’S SHADOWS.

p. 35.

“ Pembrok and his Lady discoursing, the Earl said,-The Woemen were mens shadowes, and she maintained them. Both appealing to Johnson, he affirmed it true, for which my Lady gave a pendance to prove it in verse ; hence his epigrame.”—DRUMMOND OF HAWTHORN. DEN.

Arch, Scot. iv. 95. VOL. II.

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