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OF THE

REV. PLINY FISK, A. M.

LATE MISSIONARY TO PALESTINE.

BY ALVAN BOND,
Pastor of the Congregational Church in Sturbridge, Ms.

“And hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name's sake hast

labored, and hast not fainted." Rev. ii, 3.

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Boston:
PUBLISHED BY CROCKER AND BREWSTER,

No. 47, Washington Street.
NEW-YORK: JONATHAN LEAVITT,

No. 182, Broadway.

1828.

BY 3202

F5B6

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, TO WIT:

District Clerk's Office. Be it remembered, that on the twenty-second day of December, A.D. 1827, in the fifty-second year of the Independence of the United

States of America, Crocker Brewster, of the said district, have deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as Proprietors, in the words following to wit,

“Memoir of the Rev. Pliny Fisk, A. M. late Missionary to Palestine. By Alvan Bond, Pastor of the Congregational Church in Sturbridge, Ms.

"And hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name's sake hast labored, and hast not fainted. Rev. ii, 3."

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States entitled, "An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned;' and also to an act entitled, 'an act, supplementary to an act, entitled, an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned; and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.'

JOHN W. DAVIS,} of Massachusetts.

s Clerk of the District

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PREFACE.

The establishment of a Protestant Mission in Palestine forms an important era in the history of modern missions. That country has been so exclusively under Papal and Mahommedan dominion, that it has been regarded as not only a perilous, but hopeless enterprise, to attempt there the introduction of evangelical religion. The church, since the commencement of the present century, having awaked to bolder efforts, has watched "the signs of the times” as they respect the Jewish and Mahommedan nations-nations which, like the walled cities of the Anakims, have seemed to defy whatever exertion the church could make to gain possession. Investigation has of late been made, respecting the practicability of introducing the Gospel among these "aliens. Christians in Great Britain have taken the lead in this good work, and sent men to search out the land, whose report has been,-"Let us go up at once and possess it: for we are well able to overcome it."

The same object soon arrested the attention of individuals in this country, and information relating to it was anxiously sought. A communication from a missionary at Madras, published in the London Missionary Register for 1818, and republished in some of the religious Journals of New England, was one of the first documents, in which facts were developed that suggested the expediency of establishing a mission in Jerusalem. About the same time a letter

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