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DAVIDSON'S

UNIVERSAL MELODIST,

CONSISTING OF

THE MUSIC AND WORDS

OF

POPULAR, STANDARD, AND ORIGINAL SONGS, &c.

ARRANGED SO AS TO BE EQUALLY ADAPTED FOR

THE SIGHT-SINGER,
THE PERFORMER ON THE FLUTE, CORNOPEAN, ACCORDION,

VIOLIN, OR OTHER TREBLE INSTRUMENT.

VOL. I.

* LONDON:
G. H. DAVIDSON, 19, PETER'S HILL, DOCTORS: COMMONS.

MDCCCLIII.

PREFACE.

She appearance of such a volume as this is of itself conclusive evidence of the progress made in this country, within the last few years, in the cultivation and appreciation of the science of Music. Till the delusion was dispelled by the appearance and triumphant success of “The Musical Treasury," the musical public bad been accustomed to rate themselves as so insignificant a section of the public at large, as to be induced to believe that while the greater class, from its immensity, could be supplied with literature of a high order at a price almost nominal, the lesser one was so limited in number, that nothing short of shillings for the quantity of paper and print vended to others for their pence, could possibly repay those who were magnanimous enough to minister to their circumscribed demands ;—and this notion continued to prevail for a length of years, although there is hardly in England at this time a respectable house which does not count a Piano-forte in its inventory of furniture. At length, however, appeared “The Musical Treasury," with the declared object of furnishing the Piano-fortist with Songs at Threepence each, instead of Eighteenpence; Quadrilles at Threepence, instead of Three Shillings; Overtures and Waltzes at Sixpence, instead of from Three to Five Shillings each; and all other Pieces in like ratio. The ancients of the Music Trade took their first exception to the intruder on the ground that Cheap Music could not be correct, forgetting, or not choosing to admit that correctness is a matter of capacity, not of expense—that the cost of engraving, paper, and printing, is the same for incorrect as for correct work ;-and this insinuation no doubt had its influence among small minds, till the intellectual began to compare the cheap with the dear Music, when they were rewarded by the discovery of the fact, that the one was as far above the other in general accuracy as it was below it in price. This point unwillingly conceded, the next assertion was, that correct Music at such a price must result in the ruin of those foolhardy enough to produce it. The production, however, has continued on to the extent of considerably more than 400 different Pieces, the proprietor has demonstrated the capability of paying largely out of small profits, by engaging on the work whatever talent he has thought likely to advance its ultimate importance; and “The Musical Treasury" is now the self-chosen medium of bringing before the public the writings of some of the most esteemed composers of the day-Mr. Henry Russell alone having contributed to it above Sixty of his popular Songs and Scenas.

It is the experience derived from this speculation that has given rise to the following pages. A few years ago the project would not only have failed for want of support, but the mechanical means of accomplishing it did not exist. The old-fashioned style of printing from dirty pewter-plates, clumsily punched, is wholly at variance with the production of a handsome library volume; and the uneducated character of the poor people employed in punching pewter-plates is an utter denial to their producing the literary portions of Vocal Music in a condition at all satisfactory to educated persons. Until lately, Music Type, aiso, was so imperfect, that its inefficiency was hardly counterbalanced by the more scholastic character of all Music Printing emanating from Letter-Press Printers, as distinguished from the Printer from pewter plates. But, through the enterprise of the English Type-Founders, the Letter-Press Printer is now supplied with Music Type perfectly capable of delineating every mark and direction required for the most recondite compositions; and, although the first cost of Music thus produced, instead of being cheaper, as those interested against the system would wish to be believed, amounts to about five times as much as that created under the olden system, its mathematical precision and elegance recommend it so strongly, and its great durability holds out a prospect of profit, if not large at first, yet so long-continuing, that the Publisher has felt himself justified in incurring the great ontlay necessarily occasioned in the collecting, revising, and printing of above 800 Songs, with the Music adapted alike for the Vocalist and the Performer on most Treble Instruments, and in laying them before the Musical World at the unprecedented price of Eight Shillings, in an elegant and durable binding..

Another volume of similar dimensions will follow in due course, extending the collection to above 1600 Songs, printed into volumes suitable for the shelves of the library, yet easily portable to musical unions. Simultaneously, the Publisher's Edition of “The Songs of Charles Dibdin" is reprinted for the fifth time, with numerous additions in the Musical Department--the paper, typography, and dimensions corresponding with those of this volume, and care being taken that none of the Songs of either work shall appear in the other; so that, while each has an entirety in itself, the subscriber to the whole will not be tacumbered with any thing in duplicate.

.... 424

101

430

389

271

| Bachelor's Far

Bachelor's Fare-Henry West, R.A.......... page 317
Banners are waving o'er Mowen's dark Heath.... 378
Barney Brallaghan's Courtship-Blewitt ......... 346
Be a good Buy, and take care of Yourself ........ 432
Be gone, dull Care ......................... 314
Be ye ready! your Country is calling ....

370
Beauties! there is nothing new .......

288
Beautiful Streamlet, how precious to me...
Beauty in Tatters-Augustus Voigt ...
Before and after Marriage-T. B. Brett ...

Behold me!' sang Hassan, the fearless and free.. 299
Believe me, the Spell is uobroken-H West ..... 429
Believe not the Tales they bave told thee--H. Russell 73
Ben Battle, or Faithless Nelly Gray.............. 200
Beside a Fountain Border ...................... 209
Beside the lone Sea-Melody by Bellini .......... 290
Betty Wade and Mr. Solomon-Hook............ 320
Bide ye yet-Old Scotch Song .........

275
Billy Vite and Nelly Green...................... 294
Bind thy Brow-J. M. Jolly, Poetry by J. W. Leslie 146
Black-eyed Susan-Old English Air, Poetry by Gay 304
Bless's Day! thrice happy will it prove .......... 374
Blind Mary-Irish Melody, 'In the Morning of Life' 409
Blow, blow, thou Winter's Wiod-Dr. Arne ...... 54
Blow, ye gentle Breezes-From Auber's Crown

Jewels,' Poetry by G. Soane ........
Blow, ye Winds-Verdi's 'Nino,' Poetry by G.Soane 116
Blue Bonnets over the Border....

...... 132
Bonnie Charley-Hook, Words by Upton .....

238
Bonnie Charlie-A Jacobite Song ..
Bonnie Jean-Poetry by R. Burns ...

362
Bonny Lassie, will ye go .........

....... 424
Bonnie Lizzie Baillie Scottish Melody ..,
Bonny Bet, sweet Blossom-Shield................ 40
Bonny Brave Scotland-Niel Gow.....
Bound 'Prentice to a Waterman-J. Sanderson .... 391
Boys, when I play, cry O crimini' ............... 412
Breathe not again that Dreadful Word-Irish Melo-

dy, Moore's Whene'er I see those smiling Eyes,'

the Poetry by Leman Rede ........
Brian Boru-Irish Melody, Garry Owen' ........
Bring me the Wine-Hindostanee Melody, the Poe-
try by W.Reader......

................. 361
Bruce's Address-Scots wha bae ..
Bubble, Squeak, and Pettitoes-C. Dibdin ........
Bud not yet, ye gentle Flowers - From Verdi's

Nigo,' the Words G. Soane, A.B..............
Buffalo Gals, as sung by the Ethiopian Serenaders.. 289
Bugle Song- Maria J. Kluit, Poetry translated from

the German ..................................
Burial of the Seed-Weber--the Poetry from the

German ...................................... 359
Busk ye, busk ye, my Bonny Bride Scottish Melody
But are ye sure the News is true ?.............
By a Murmuring Brook-Sir J. A. Stevenson .....
By Moonlight he met her.......
By Rhine's Blue Waters, or On Yonder Rock Re.

clining'-Scena in Fra Diavolo'...............
By the gaily circling Glass-Dr. Arne .............
By the side of a murmuring Stream..............

I UOW................

A Cavalier gallop'd.......................... page 26
A Chieftain to the Highlands bound......
A Christmas Carol-H. Russell, Poetry by C, Dickens 38
A Farewell, to an Air by Mozart.... .......... 237
A flaxen-headed Cow-boy.........

57
A Frog he would a Wooing go...... ............ 166
A Goblet of Wine-J.M.Jolly, Poetry byJ.W.Leslie 139
A Hero's Life I sing, bis Story sbali my Pen mark. 303
A Knight and a Lady once met in a Grove ........ 408
A Lay of Greeting from afar-H.R.H. Prince Albert 285
A Life by de Galley Fire-Parody, as sung by the

Ethiopian Serenaders ...................... .. 353
A Life in the West-H. Russell, Poetry by G.P.Morris 216
- A Life on the Ocean Wave-H. Russell .......... 353

A Man's a Man for a' that-Burns .............. 28
A poor Soul sat sighing beneath a tall Tree ...... 272
A Prey to tender Anguish-Haydn ...............
A Tale I'll tell you without any Flam ............ 190
A Thousand Years ago-Spohr .................. 288
A Traveller stopp'd at a Widow's Gate-Gilfert .. 73
A weary Lot is thine, Fair Maid-Poetry by Scott. 123
A wee Bird cam' to our Ha' Door ................ 270
A wbile the Maid the Stranger ey'd .............. 172
A Wolf, while Jutta slept-Kelly-Words by Lewis 415
A young Rose in my Garden grew-H. Russell ... 206
Across the Downs, this Morning ..

160
Across the troubled Loch I see .....

320
Adieu, my lor'd Harp! ...

334
Adieu, my Native Land! adieu

.279
Adown in the Valley ............................ 155
Advertisement for a Wife.........
Ae Nicht i' the Gloamin', as late I pass'd by ... 355
Agwine down to New Orleans ....

156
Ab, sure a Pair was never seen-From the Duenna. 169
Ah, where the Fairy Vision-From Opera of Tarrare 99
Alice Gray-Mrs. P. Millard ..........

134
All around the May- Pole-Dr. Arne....

324
All hail, happy Meeting-T. B. Brett .....

201
All hush'd were the Breezes.......

279
All in the Downs the Fleet was moor'd............ 304
All the World bas been ask'd to the Party To-night 358
Al to astonish the Browns, as sung by H. Russell 16
Allen Brooke of Wyndermere-Hook ........... 309
Allons, Enfans de la Patrie--the Marseillois Hymn 422
Alone by the Light of the Moon-Hook .......... 386
Alva-Irish Melody, Moore's 'Rich and Rare,
Poetry by Leman Rede ....................

110
An Irish Drinking-Song-C. Dibdin...
An' thou were my Ain Thing ...
Anacreon, they say, was a Jolly Old Blade.

236
And has she then fail'd in her Tratb ....
And must I part with Thee ....
And this I think a Reason fair-C. Dibdin ..... 394
And we're a' Noddin'.......
Annie and Jamie-Scottish Melody, J. Sanderson 425
Annie Dear 1-Irish Melody, Poetry by T. Davis ..

168
Annie Laurie-Scottish Melody .....

132
Another Cup, and then-C. Dibdin ....

214
As down on Banna's Banks I stray'd

255
As I roam'd the Fields along .....

304
As I was a walking................

25
As I was rambling down de Street ...

289
As I was sitting in my Room
Ask if yon Damask Rose be sweet...

230
Assist me, ye Lads who have Hearts.

232
As walking forth to view the Plain ......
At Ratcliff Cross, the other Day...........

368
At Sixteen Years old........

244
At the Baron of Mowbray's Gate was seen....
At the peaceful Midnight Hour.........

369
Attend to me, Landsmen and Sailors ...... 231
Attend unto me for a Wbile.......

......... 157
Altune the Pipe; attune the gladspine Lay --- Plyel. 375
Auld Lang Syne-Scottish Melody, Poetry by Burns 104
Auld Robin Gray-Words by Lady Anne Lindsay.. 6
Away, away, with the Willow........

............... 146
Away down in New Orleans I gets upon de Landin' 383
Away! we know that Tears are valo-P. W. Porter

--Poetry by Lord Byron ...................... 407
ay with Me.ancholy-Mozart ................ 46

Breath when I plato a Waterm Gow...;

72

167
257

192

426

435

335

Can native Scenes delight me...............
Can't you dance the Polka-S. D. Saunders...... 12
Carlisle Wall-P. W. Porter, Poetry by Sir W. Scott 423
Cauld blaws the Wind from North to South ...... 207
Cease, rude Boreas, blust'ring Railer--Falcorer ..
Chains on the Cities, Gloom in the Air ...........
Charlie is my Darling .........
Chloe's to be my Wife-As sung by the Ethiopian

Serenaders .................................. 416
Choose ye, who will ..
Chundah's Song-Hindostanee Melody
Clan Gregor-Philip Koapton ....

293
Clouds that sweep the Midnight Heav'n....
Come all ye jolly Sailors bold ...
Come all you Blades, both high and low ..

294
Come, boat me ower ..................
Come, Brothers, arouse-Henry Russell ..
Come, buy my Ballads-M. P. King.....
'Come, cheer up, my Lads-Dr Boyce ........

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Come, dance, and put your Work away ...... page 97
Come, 6ll the Cup-H. Russell, Poetry by H.G. Sharpe 72
* Come, gie's a Sang,' Montgomery cried... 388
Come hither, thou beautiful Rover .... .......... 345
Come, if you dare--From Artaxerxes .....

213
Come in the Ey'ping ................... ......... 187
Come, Lads, here's good Luck ............

56
Come, list, ye fair Maids .....

126
Come, listen, kind Gentlefolks all---H. Russell ..., 322
Come, live with me and be my Love-C. Morley .. 155
Come, Love, to me-Serenade J. M. Jolly........ 47
Come, my Friends !--Druids' March in Norma, the

Words by G. Soane, A.B........
Come now, all ye Social Pow'rs......
Come, r ve with me J. F. Danneley, Poetry by C.

Mackay ...........
Come, sweet One ! come !-H.R.H. Prince Albert. 292
Come to these Arms, my own true-hearted........ 3
Comin' thro' the Rye...
Could the Voice that I lov'd wake again-Irish

Mielorly, Moore's 'She is far from the Land,' the

Poetry by Leman Rede.....
Crazy Jane-Miss Abrams, Poetry by Monk Lewis. 263
Cupid I lovely charming Boy !...

......... 404
Capid mid the Roses playing-J. P. Knight ...... 97
Cushlamacbree-Irish Melody .................. 248

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Fair Lake! whose bright Crystal ............page
Fair one! take this Hose .......
Fairest of the Virgin Train ....

..... 245
Faithless Emma-Sir J. A. Stevenson .......
Fancy dipp'd her Pen in Dew-Whitaker .... 342
Far, far from me--M. P. King ...
Far in the wild Wood ....................
Far over yon Hills of the Heather sae green

307
Far remov'd from Noise and Smoke .....
Far remov'd from the Town .............

372
Fare Thee Well-Mozart, Poetry by Lord Byron.. 81
Farewell, Sweet C.Gilfert, Poetryby H.F.Heathcote 8
Farewell, thou Stream-Burns .......

1
Farewell to old England ! tby white Cliffs, Adieu ! 213
Father! I call on Thee, German Prayer-Himmel 241
Fill! 611 !-From Flotow's 'Stradella'..........
Fill! fill ! till the Glass runs o'er-Der Freyschutz 77
Fill up each Glass .............................. 1
Fisher's Song--Adapted to an Air by Von Rhyn .. 26
Flora M‘Donald's Lament-Neil Gow, jun. ...... 907
Flow, thou regal purple Stream-Dr. Arnold...... 305
Fly not yet-Moore's Irish Melody .............. 12
For England, when, with fav'ring Gale .....
For Freedom and his Native Land ............... 264
For Tenderness form'd...............
Forget me not...................... ........... 249
Forgive the Muse that slumber'd-Irish Melody,

Moore's I'd mourn the Hopes,' Poetry by L, Rede 46
For thee all the Hardships of Life I could bear.... :96
Fresh and strong the Breeze is blowing-Dr. Arne. 10
Friend of my Soul, when all has fled-Auber...... 243
From aloft the Sailor looks—Storace .....
From Distant Climes-J. Magrath...
From Night till Morn ....

203
From the Danube was he riding-N. Co

419
From the steep Promontory gaz'd.....
From the white-blossom'd Slue ...........
Funny and free are the Bachelor's Revelries ......

pula, Poetry by Leman Rede ..

141

302

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Gaffer Grixt, Gaffer's Son......
Gaieté de Caur--Adapted to an Air by Winter ...
Gentle Youth ! ah tell me why-Dr. Arne ......
Gentle Zitella! whither away.......
Get up and bar the Door-oid Scotch Song.
Gin a Body meet a Body .....
Gin I had a wee House, and a canty wee Fire
Glowing with Love, on Fire for Fame.

237
Go at Midnight's Dreamy Hour ..
God of Peace ! before thee, peaceful, bere we kneel 391
God Save the Queen .............

.............. 436
Gramachree, Molly !- Irish Melody.............. 255
Gratitude--W. Reeve ...... .................. 214
Green grow the Rashes, 01-Poetry by Burns .... 34
Green were the Fields where my Forefathers dwelt 98

301

188

372

Dance, Boatman, dance-As sung by H. Russell ..
Mandy Jim of Caroline-As sung by H. Russell .. 25
Dark-ey'd Beauty-Air 'Tu non sai,' La Sonnam-

140
Dark, dark, was the Dungeon, and bumid the Walls 295
Dark lour'd the Night, loud roar'd the Main ... 297
Day again is ending, from Rossini's 'Semiramide' 432
Daylight blushes o'er the Mountain .............. 212
Days of Yore-W. A. Nield...
De Dandy Broadway Swell-As sung by the Ethio-

pian Serenaders ............. ........... 433
De Jaw-bone hung ober de Log-hut Fire.......... 102
De Merry Shoe-Black-Negro Melody....

156
De Queerest Chap I eber see .................... 66
Dear Erin, how sweetly thy greep Bosom rises.... 2-48
Dear Father! smile !-Alex. Lee, Poetry by Baily.. 165
Dear Heart I how this World............

38
Dear Land-Irish Melody, Poetry by Sliabh Cuilinn 185
Dear Mary, Adieu !................

215
Dear Scenes of Youth-Miss Dixon ......

312
Dear Tom, this brown Jug .....
Dearest Girl! I soon must leave thee !--Stevenson 296
Deep in the Abruzzl-From Flotow's 'Stradella,'

Poetry by G. Soane, A.B....
Deep o'er Alva's Tower falls.....
Der Trinker, the Tippler-C, Walther....
Dere's some one in de House wid Dinah ... 321
Descend, ye chaste Nine! ................ 105
Despair-Haydn ................................ 29
Devotion--D'Alquen, Poetry by Sforza..... 329
Dicky Gossip--As sung by the celebrated Mr. Suett 235
Did ye see the red Rose on its boony green Stem.. 387
Did you ne'er hear a Tale ...................... 155
Die Feen Konigion---the Fairy Queen-C. Walther 393
Diogenes, sorly and proud ...................... 254
Does my Brother think of me--Translated from the

German of Prince Ernest, Music by Prince Albert 412
Donald-Old Scotch Song .....
Don't be in such a Hurry-W. T. Parke.....
Dorsetshire House ..
Dost ask me how I am ?
Down among the Dead Men .......
Down by the River there grows a Green Willow-

Storace, Words by G. Colman...
Dumble Dum Deary ...
Dunois the Brave-French Romance.........
Early Days ! how fair and fleeting !-Stevenson ..
Earth, to thy Bosom ....................
Eleven Years bave pass'd away .............
Encompass'd in an Angel's Frame-Jackson..
England, Home of the FreeOscar Perry ...
Ere around the Huge Oak-Shield ..
Erin Go Bragh........

Donald of Prince of me
Don't be in Scotch Sons, Nusic by

Had I a Cave on some distant Short-Burns...... 1
Had I a Heart for Falsehood fram'd-Irish Melody,

Moore's "The Harp that once' ................ 112
Hallo ! ye my Fellows arise and advance........ 364
Hamlet-Mock Heroic, by Hook, to the Tune of

Lunnun is the Devil'........................ 303
Happy Friendship-Old Scotch Air, Poetry by Burus 362
Happy he, to whom kind Heaven ................
Happy we are a' thegither......
Hark! I hear the Ocean's whelming Sweep-Moore's

'Love's Young Dream,' Poetry by Leman Rede.. 129
Hark, Phillis ! bark !......

...... 244
Hark! the Merry Bells-From Flotow's Stradella' 159
Hark! the Bells are gaily Ringing-Verdi's Nino' 1:27
Hark! the Song of the moaning Vesper Gale-Hin-
dostanee Melody, Poetry by W. Reader

........ 421
Hark! with what Glee yon merry Clown ........

240
Harvest Home-J. Davy, Poetry by T. Dibdin .... 402
Hassan the Brave-Poetry by Sir Walter Scott .... 299
Ha te ! haste! I prithee haste away-1. Nathan ..
Have I then the Lyre forsaken .............
Have ye Faith in One Another-T. B. Brett ... 210
He comes from the Wars......
He loves and he rides away-C. E. Horn .....
He shineth out .......
He was fam'd for Deeds of Arms-Corri .... 224
He's comin' again .....
He's ower the Hills that I loe weel ...

.... 239
Hear me! Love I-From Weber's Der Freyschutz' 66
Heigho for a Husband ..
Helen-Irish Melody, Moore's Meeting of the Wa-

ters,' the Poetry by Lemau Rede ..........

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