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Books Books 91 - 100 of 123 on The question with me is not whether you have a right to render your people miserable,....
" The question with me is not whether you have a right to render your people miserable, but whether it is not your interest to make them happy. It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do, but what humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do. "
The Principles of Rhetoric and Their Application - Page 130
by Adams Sherman Hill - 1881 - 306 pages
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The Morality of Consent

Alexander M. Bickel - Law - 1975 - 156 pages
...said Burke to the government of King George III in his second speech on conciliation with America, "what a lawyer tells me I may do; but what humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do." The fact is that no measures of pervasive application can or should rest on narrow majorities. These...
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The Age of Liberty: Sweden 1719-1772

Michael Roberts - History - 2003 - 244 pages
...question of expediency, still debatable. Half a century later Burke would be reminding his hearers that, 'It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do, but what humanity, reason and justice tell me that I ought to do'; and that was a consideration which was - usually - kept in mind. So much so, that...
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The Transatlantic Persuasion: The Liberal-Democratic Mind in the Age of ...

Robert Lloyd Kelley - History - 1990 - 433 pages
...204-5. emotion and the itch to assert a "rightful" power. "The question with me is," he said in 1775, "not whether you have a right to render your people miserable, but whether it is not in your interest to make them happy."2 To those who argued that the colonists were committing a criminal...
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Pre-Revolutionary Writings

Edmund Burke, Ian Harris - History - 1993 - 328 pages
...whole have sunk. I do not intend to be overwhelmed in that bog, though in such respectable company. The question with me is, not whether you have a right...whether it is not your interest to make them happy? Is it not, what a lawyer tells me, I may do; but what humanity, reason, and justice, tell me, I ought...
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Edmund Burke and the Discourse of Virtue

Stephen H. Browne - Biography & Autobiography - 1993 - 143 pages
...but not abstractly, concretely but not pedantically. Burke can now claim without inconsistency that it "is not what a lawyer tells me I may do, but what...humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do." Here the appeal to circumstances and principled response conflates motives to honor and expedience,...
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In Defense of Politics

Bernard Crick - Political Science - 1993 - 272 pages
...responsibility to make a peace that would endure. ' It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do,' cried Burke, 'but what humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do. Is a political act the worse for being a generous one ? ' Also, it is hard not to think that the demand...
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The Useful Cobbler: Edmund Burke and the Politics of Progress

James Conniff - Political Science - 1994 - 363 pages
...sentences. "I am not determining a point of law; I am restoring tranquillity," he argued; therefore, "it is not what a lawyer tells me I may do, but what...humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do." 46 If, he continued, the Americans have violated the Declaratory Act, or some other law passed in its...
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Spirals of Suffering: Public Violence and Children

Brian Rock, Human Sciences Research Council - Children - 1997 - 323 pages
...it tends to be in South Africa. What is important, as Edmund Burke says, is not "what a lawyer says I may do; but what humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do". In any event, to talk of "individual human rights" is a contradiction in terms: they must be one or...
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What America Owes the World: The Struggle for the Soul of Foreign Policy

H. W. Brands, Henry William Brands - History - 1998 - 335 pages
...principle for principle's sake was the mark of folly rather than wisdom. Again Morgenthau turned to Burke: "The question with me is not whether you have a right...humanity, reason and justice tell me I ought to do." Sixth, nations must avoid putting themselves in positions from which retreat entailed loss of prestige,...
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On Empire, Liberty, and Reform: Speeches and Letters

Edmund Burke - History - 2000 - 525 pages
...people, Burke concludes, is the history of liberty itself. So while urging a prudential wisdom — "The question with me is not, whether you have a right...whether it is not your interest to make them happy" — he now adds a practical corollary: "An Englishman is the unfittest person on earth to argue another...
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