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" What thou seest, What there thou seest, fair creature, is thyself; With thee it came and goes : but follow me, And I will bring thee where no shadow stays Thy coming, and thy soft embraces ; he Whose image thou art, him thou shalt enjoy Inseparably thine,... "
The poetical works of John Milton. Paradise lost and regained - Page 90
by John Milton - 1860
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The Paradise Lost

Bible - 1838 - 373 pages
...fix'd Mine eyes till now, and pin'd with vain desire, Had not a voice thus warn'd me ; " What thou se" What there thou seest, fair creature, is thyself;...straight, invisibly thus led ? Till I espied thee, fair indeed and tall, Under a planate : yet methought less fair, Less winning soft, less amiably mild, Than...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton: With Notes and a Life of the Author, Volume 1

John Mitford - 1838
...465 Mine eyes till now, and pin'd with vain desire, Had not a voice thus warn'd me, What thou seest, What there thou seest, fair creature, is thyself;...follow me, And I will bring thee where no shadow stays 470 Thy coming, and thy soft embraces ; he Whose image thou art, him thou shalt enjoy Inseparably thine,...
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Le Paradis perdu de J. Milton

John Milton - 1841 - 479 pages
...eyes till now, and pin'd with vain desire, " Had not a voice thus warn'd me : ' What thou seest, " ' What there thou seest, fair creature, is thyself;...straight, invisibly thus led, ," Till I espied thee, fair indeed, and tall, " Underaplatain?yet, methought, less fair, " Less winning soft, lesa amiably mild,...
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Select Works of the British Poets: In a Chronological Series from Ben Jonson ...

John Aikin - English poetry - 1841 - 807 pages
...fair creature, is thyself; With thee it came and goes: but follow me, And I will bring thee Avhere re on the vEgean shore a city stands, Huilt nobly, pure Alultitudes like thyself, and thence be call'd Mother of human race.' What could I do, But follow straight,...
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The Works of Joseph Addison, Volumes 1-2

Joseph Addison - 1842
...not a voice thus warn'd me : " What thou seest, What there thou sees!, fair creature, is thyself j and sweat of the brows. Providence furnishes materials,...ourselves. The earth must be laboured before it gives its shall enjoy, Inseparably thine ; to him shale bear Multitude* like thyself, and thence be caird Mother...
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An Essay on Elocution: With Elucidatory Passages from Various Authors

John Hanbury Dwyer - 1843
...fix'd Mine eyes till now, and pined with vain desire, Had not a voice thus warned me : what thou seest, What there thou seest, fair creature, is thyself;...What could I do, But follow straight, invisibly thus ledT Till I espied thee, fair indeed, and tall, Under a plantain, yet melhought less fair, Less winning...
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The poetical works of John Milton, with a memoir by J. Montgomery, Volume 1

John Milton - 1843
...fix'd Mine eyes till now, and pined with vain desire, Had not a voice thus warned me : What thou seest, What there thou seest, fair creature, is thyself;...thence be call'd Mother of human race. What could I do, Bui follow straight, invisibly thus led ? Till I espied thee, fair, indeed, and tall, Under a plantane,...
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Select Works of the British Poets, in a Chronological Series from Ben Jonson ...

John Aikin - English poetry - 1843 - 807 pages
...pin'd with vain desire, Had not a voice thus warn'd me ; ' What thou seest, What there thou seest, (air ) Acme's bosom was alone The whole world's imperial...Septimius was all human-kind. If the gods would please t ho Whose image thou art ; him thou shalt enjoy Inseparably thine, to him shall bear Multitudes like...
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Cyclopędia of English Literature, Volume 1

Robert Chambers - English literature - 1844
...not a voice thus warn'd me ; ' What thou seest, What there thou seest, fair creature, is thvsclf : У >| g F Y ; 3 J W 8 J a t ` } indeed and tall, Under a plantain ; yet methought less fuir, Less winning soft, less amiably mild,...
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An Essay on Elocution: With Elucidatory Passages from Various Authors : to ...

John Hanbury Dwyer - Elocution - 1844 - 300 pages
...fix'd Mine eyes till now, and pined with vain desire, Had not a voice thus warned me : what thou seest, What there thou seest, fair creature, is thyself;...thy soft embraces, he Whose image thou art; him thou shall enjoy Inseparably thine, to him shall bear Multitudes like thyself, and thence be call'd Mother...
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